Browsing Tag

Law Enforcement

Wolf Hunger by Paige Tyler

Posted in Action/Adventure/ Advanced Reader Copy/ Contemporary Romance/ Fantasy/ Magic/Paranormal/ Mystery/Crime/ Netgalley/ Reviews/ Romantic Suspense/ Speculative Fiction/ Urban Fantasy 19th September 2017
Wolf Hunger by Paige TylerWolf Hunger by Paige Tyler
Series: SWAT, #7
Published by Sourcebooks Casablanca on December 5th 2017
Pages: 212
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
four-stars

Wolf shifter and SWAT Officer Max Lowry falls hard for she-wolf Lana Mason, but things spiral out of control when wolf hunters track her down, and Max realizes Lana has no idea who--or what--she really is.

When I first began Paige Tyler’s SWAT series some time ago, I did not expect it to take several turns which just didn’t resonate enough with me from book 3 onwards as SWAT members one after another, fell for their one and only mate in a blazing fashion that pretty  much meant instalove, instalust and an insta-HEA all rolled in one.

With ‘Wolf Hunger’ though, the series seemed to regain lost ground and the story was pretty much a savagely entertaining ride throughout. I’ve always wanted Max’s story and Tyler definitely delivered, especially after the listless reads from the previous books in this series that meandered a couple of times around the ‘been there, done that’ patch of grass, with a mythos that got less and less convincing as it wore on. But for this one, I jumped straight into Max’s and Lana’s story, only to get gut-punched by his tragic history, before getting reeled in by the thoroughly engrossing journey of Max finding his One (who didn’t know she was a werewolf) just as the werewolf hunters closed in on them.

There was some instalove involved still—the attraction between Max and Lana is written as iron-clad, set-in-stone and pretty much unshakeable from the beginning—but because both are generally likeable characters who don’t lurch into TSTL territory. Coupled with the fact that the instalove was also quite well-balanced by the suspense, I didn’t find it too hard to get invested in this pairing hook, line and sinker.

Above all, Tyler’s expansion of her werewolf universe certainly gave ‘Wolf Hunter’ more nuance and depth while melding a little humour with a ton of paranormal suspense. I liked that the introduction of the hunters showed the SWAT team’s vulnerability—that they do have enemies that can develop effective weapons against them—and I’m already hoping that Tyler works along this line for the next few books to come.

four-stars

Cold Malice by Toni Anderson

Posted in Advanced Reader Copy/ Contemporary Romance/ Mystery/Crime/ Reviews/ Romantic Suspense 17th September 2017
Cold Malice by Toni AndersonCold Malice by Toni Anderson
Series: Cold Justice #8
Published by Toni Anderson on September 12th 2017
Pages: 326
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
four-stars

ASAC Steve (Mac) McKenzie is out to prove himself by leading a task force investigating a series of murders in the heart of Washington, DC. His undercover work in an antigovernment compound twenty years earlier is related—as is the sweet, innocent girl he befriended back then. Now that girl is a beautiful woman, and she has something to hide.

Tess Fallon spent a lifetime trying to outrun her family’s brand of bigotry, but someone is threatening her anonymity by using the anniversary of her father’s death to carry out evil crimes and she’s terrified her younger brother is involved. She sets out to find the truth and comes face-to-face with a man she once idolized, a man she thought long dead. As the crimes escalate it becomes obvious the killer has an agenda, and Tess and Mac are running out of time to stop him.

Will the perpetrator use a decades-old dream of revolution to attack the federal government? And will the fact that Tess and Mac have fallen hard for each other give a cold-hearted killer the power to destroy them both?

What begins as seemingly unrelated, cold-blooded murders appears to be an act of white supremacist leanings and at the heart of it would be a woman whose father was the leader of such a group, who also, twenty years ago, had been freed of that life when Steve McKenzie worked undercover at their complex. But 2 decades isn’t long enough apparently, for some ghosts to stay buried and this time, Mac’s reentry into Tess Fallon’s life is anything but coincidence when the resurrection of the dogmas of white nationalists begins with a rising body count of specifically targeted individuals.

I’m going to say from the start that ‘Cold Malice’ is a jaw-dropping, romantic-suspense-at-its-finest type of read. With multifaceted, fully fleshed out protagonists at its helm, the conflict around which the plot is centred has such chilling relevance for the times we live in, lending the whole story a believability that makes Anderson’s brand of fiction as large as reality. In fact, it’s so intricately plotted, so heart-poundingly intense and just so well done that I couldn’t put the book down, even when sleep was calling.

And where do I even begin with Toni Anderson’s characters? Tess Fallon in this case, had wholly won me over. She’s everything I love in a heroine: brave, loyal, protective and so strong as she fights a parentage anyone would be ashamed of. I couldn’t blame her at all for not fully trusting Mac for simply showing up 20 years with a different identity then demanding her cooperation; coupled with the fact that she had to pay for her family’s sins and run from a past that wasn’t even quite her own—compounded by the FBI who vilified her—felt like a massively unfair position she’d been put in. That she’d dealt with it the only way she knew how to—by protecting her brother, by keeping some walls up—was not only understandable, but justified.

On the other hand, it was harder to like Mac, whose own conflict about his job and Tess’s involvement in the case left him indecisive about her. Using their connection to further his investigations merely served to confirm how much of an arse he could be and there were numerous instances when I thought Tess deserved better for the crap she’d been dealt from all sides.

My only complaint (which probably seems like a petty one given how excellent everything else is) is that as a romance, the speedy conclusion seems to do a disservice to Tess, where Mac’s major grovelling session which I absolutely needed to see never really happened at all. I didn’t think he’d redeemed himself enough to earn back her affection when all he’d done was to put his job above her, with his doubts blindingly overshadowing what he really felt for her. With a fairly quick resolution, I felt that this important bit where broken parts of a relationship are repaired had been glossed over, leaving me with a pairing that seemed to have done their making up and talking behind closed doors.

Then again, it isn’t as if this should throw any shade on Anderson’s fantastic writing. ‘Cold Malice’ is yet another masterpiece of hers and I’m actually convinced that this author does RS so well that she’s actually suited to writing for the big screen. Needless to say, I’m already asking, when’s the next full novel coming?

four-stars

Her Last Goodbye by Melinda Leigh

Posted in Advanced Reader Copy/ Contemporary Romance/ Mystery/Crime/ Netgalley/ Reviews/ Romantic Suspense 26th August 2017
Her Last Goodbye by Melinda LeighHer Last Goodbye by Melinda Leigh
Series: Morgan Dane #2
Published by Montlake Romance on September 26th 2017
Pages: 334
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
four-stars

Young mother Chelsea Clark leaves the house for a girls’ night out…and vanishes. Her family knows she would never voluntarily leave her two small children. Her desperate husband—also the prime suspect—hires Morgan to find his wife and prove his innocence.

As a single mother, Morgan sympathizes with Chelsea’s family and is determined to find her. She teams up with private investigator Lance Kruger. But the deeper they dig, the deadlier their investigation gets. When Morgan is stalked by a violent predator, everything—and everyone—she holds dear is in grave danger.

Now, Morgan must track down a deranged criminal to protect her own family…but she won’t need to leave home to find him. She’s his next target.

Sometimes it seems as though I’ve been waiting for Melinda Leigh’s sequel to ‘Say You’re Sorry’ for too long. But Lance Kruger and Morgan Dane have not strayed too far from my thoughts so it’s relatively easy to slip back into their world where they are more than friends but not quite lovers, working together against crime just as they iron out the kinks in their own relationship. Leigh left them in a very hopeful position when the first book ended, and I was thrilled to read more simply because she handles pacing, dialogue and adult character-interactions brilliantly.

A new case that Lance and Morgan deal with—the disappearance of a parent of an infant—takes precedence over the romance, as it did with the first book. On its own, the case didn’t seem like a standout at first, but Leigh’s writing is compelling enough to make me stick with it, if only for the way her characters carry out an adult relationship that I find so sorely lacking in books these days. Lance and Morgan, whose romance is barely there at all, have such chemistry it’s hard to look away as they work as a team already in sync. Sometimes it seems as though they’re superhuman, doing all the things they do with little sleep and a ton of other things to juggle.

The mystery of the missing women—when truth finally came out—was a bit more contrived than I expected but it’s something I can overlook maybe because the rest was just done deftly. Generally speaking though, intelligent writing, maturity of characters and some subtle inserts of heat and humour have made me a fan of this series and ‘Her Last Goodbye’ is definitely more than a decent read.

four-stars

Touch of Red by Laura Griffin

Posted in Advanced Reader Copy/ Contemporary Romance/ Mystery/Crime/ Netgalley/ Reviews/ Romantic Suspense 24th August 2017
Touch of Red by Laura GriffinTouch of Red by Laura Griffin
Series: Tracers #12
Published by Pocket Books on October 31st 2017
Pages: 368
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
four-stars

When crime scene investigator Brooke Porter arrives at the home of a murdered woman, the only thing more shocking than the carnage is the evidence that someone escaped the scene. But where is this witness now? A thorough search of the area yields more questions than answers, and before Brooke even packs up her evidence kit, she’s made it her goal to find the witness and get them out of harm’s way.

Homicide detective Sean Byrne has seen his share of bloody crime scenes, but this one is particularly disturbing, especially because Brooke Porter is smack in the middle of it. Sean has had his eye on the sexy CSI for months, and he’s determined to help her with her current case—even if it means putting his attraction on hold so he and Brooke can track down a murderer. But as the investigation—and their relationship—heats up, Sean realizes that keeping his work and his personal life separate is more complicated than he ever imagined; especially when the killer sets his sights on Brooke.

Laura Griffin’s ‘Tracers’ series is such a unique one, or at least, the premise of her stories mirrors the TV series ‘Bones’ so much that it’s hard not to like the way the action unfolds. Griffin’s masterful writing, her deft handling of characters and the intricate details of forensic anthropology and crime investigation don’t hurt either, though it always takes me by surprise that secondary characters who pop up early on in the series (that I’ve long forgotten about) actually do get their own stories much later on.

That said, some of her books have admittedly been a hit or miss for me, and few are true standouts because the plots are tried-and-tested formulas that have worked well, though sometimes quite forgettably so after the ride is over. Like many of Griffin’s other books in the series, ‘Touch of Red’ starts with a murder by the way of a hapless victim brutally murdered in a way that gets everyone reeling, with clues pointing every which way until several keys are unearthed to the point where the whole story makes sense.

In this case, I was more absorbed by the clues and the investigation as detail after chilling detail unfolded than I was by Brooke/Sean’s developing relationship, not because they didn’t have chemistry, but because that perhaps, had to do with the fact that Griffin’s Delphi employee/Cop pairings started to look interchangeable after a while.

Nevertheless, what makes ’Touch of Red’ enjoyable is that Griffin hardly ever writes just a whodunnit book. It’s part-police procedural, part-thriller and romantic suspense where the romance develops by way of the investigation, though it never really is quite the focus of the book. The delicate balance is handled well though, and that mix will probably satisfy both romance-seeking and crime-loving readers.

four-stars

Deadly Secrets by Misty Evans

Posted in Contemporary Romance/ Mystery/Crime/ Reviews/ Romantic Suspense 23rd August 2017
Deadly Secrets by Misty EvansDeadly Secrets by Misty Evans
Series: Southern California Violent Crimes Taskforce, #7
Published by Beach Path Publishing, LLC on August 22nd 2017
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
three-stars

He killed my best friend when we were only girls…but I got away. Now he’s hunting me again.

Well-renowned anthropologist and religious studies expert, Dr. Brooke Heaton, came face to face with evil as a ten-year-old, barely escaping a vicious, ritualistic serial killer. Now The Reverend, her childhood attacker, is hunting her once more, determined not to let her get away this time—and there’s only one man who can keep her alive.

Homeland Security agent Roman Walsh wants two things: to end The Reverend’s reign of terror and to get the sexy Dr. Heaton into his bed. When the two goals collide, can he keep his own deadly secrets buried?

Agreeing to consult on The Reverend’s case, little does Brooke realize the emotional chunk it will carve out of her soul and the burning need Roman will ignite inside her. She’ll have one last chance to stop the killer, or the ghost from her past will get his cold-blooded revenge—on her and everyone she cares about—once and for all.

‘Deadly Secrets’ started out very well for me, reading like a suspense thriller with a little bit of the Da Vinci Code thrown in. Put in ancient symbols, the occult and folklore and I’m sold on the creepiness factor. There’s loads of action, good pacing and dialogue—there isn’t a bored moment, especially for a sub-genre like romantic suspense—and it all went very well for me, up to a point.

I do realise that that is the typical Misty Evans read for me: it’ll all go swimmingly until a certain point when something goes awry with the characterisation or plot which will throw off the entire experience. I’d completely dug both Brooke and Roman till then as well, more the latter though, as he seemed more like a stable character than the former.

The Brooke Heaton of the first half of the story seemed like a completely different person from the one in the second half—she seemed a wee bit more TSTL, more headstrong and became a seductress to boot as the ‘frumpy’ academic, detached and closed-off appeared to have had a personality transplant.

But Brooke is also the meta-figure for the romance reader, as I soon found out, and I wasn’t too sure how I felt about that, especially when Evans used her own book as an example (that was just bloody strange) of how readers start to compare their own situations (sometimes fancifully) to what real life is, only to get disappointed. While it was cute to start with, it popped up too frequently though, even being mentioned as part of the conflict between Brooke and Roman, which got annoying.

The mystery of the serial killing also turned out to be something more ‘mundane’ than I’d expected too, as the theories that Evans built up from the start were simply put to the side when the conflict came down to Brooke’s past. Without revealing too much, I found myself bewildered and not entirely convinced by the ‘revelations’ at the end and even much less so by the quick resolution and the even quicker proposal.

I do think that ‘Deadly Secrets’ could have been much more for me; unfortunately, the last half—despite the great action—fell flat in a way that made it hard to get behind the characters, much less their abrupt HEA.

three-stars

Beneath the Truth by Meghan March

Posted in Contemporary Romance/ Mystery/Crime/ New Adult/ Reviews/ Romantic Suspense 17th August 2017
Beneath the Truth by Meghan MarchBeneath The Truth by Meghan March
Series: Beneath #7
on August 8th 2017
Pages: 350
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
three-stars

I used to believe there were lines in life you don't cross. Don't lie. Don't cheat. Don't steal.Until I learned people don't always practice what they preach.I turned in my badge and gun and walked away from everything.Then I got the call no one wants, and I’m back in New Orleans.What I don't expect is for her to be here too.Another line you don’t cross?Don't touch your best friend’s little sister.She's always been off-limits. Too bad I don't follow the rules anymore.

Second-chance romances or unrequited crush/love stories have always been tricky for me, and I admit that it’s got to leap over a heap of scepticism that I’ve developed when it comes to such tropes. That’s mostly because my vindictive, cynical self always has a basic set of questions which are more often than not, left unsatisfactorily answered. Maybe this is a defensive reaction, because most of the time, someone (typically the heroine) caves way too fast and too easily, without giving the other party a hard time about it—call it payment for years of pain and longing, I guess.

In essence, this trope spurs me to ask: what flipped that switch? Why only now, after all this time? Did this ‘second-chance’ happen only because one party (typically the hero’s side) suddenly decide that his blinkers fell off and that he needed to ‘claim’ a woman who had been there and pining all along? Or did this opportunity just happen to come along and someone decided to go along with it, without having given a thought to the other protagonist for years and doing anything about it?

Rhett Hennessy’s and Ariel Sampson’s relationship fits this to a tee. A lifelong crush on Ariel’s part, with Rhett determinedly ignoring her until one day he decides he’s going to move in for the kill like a neanderthal, on his own time. It was frankly, hard to accept when it didn’t take too much effort on his part to do so because every single bit of attention he paid her apparently got her panties wet, but thankfully, Meghan March doesn’t dwell on this too long.

Rhett and Ariel do slide into a relationship a tad bit too easily, but that’s also because a suspense/mystery plot takes over. The romance sorts itself the moment Rhett/Ariel got their act together early on and my strong opinions dulled when the dirty cop mystery grew. I did think however, that the story did try to juggle a little too much though—the mess with an ex-boyfriend, dirty cops and mafia involvement seemed to mesh in a way that stretched my ability to suspend disbelief.

The long and short of it is, it was an alright read; I didn’t hate it but I wasn’t blown away either. ‘Beneath the truth’ is definitely much more than just unrequited crushes fulfilled, though I couldn’t have guessed how much it tries to incorporate suspense when I haven’t read the rest of the series. But it’s perfectly fine as a standalone, though a little catching up to get into it might be needed.

three-stars

Perilous Trust by Barbara Freethy

Posted in Contemporary Romance/ Reviews/ Romantic Suspense 4th August 2017
Perilous Trust by Barbara FreethyPerilous Trust (Off The Grid: FBI Trilogy #1) by Barbara Freethy
Series: Off the Grid #1
Published by Fog City Publishing, LLC - Hyde Street Press on August 1st 2017
Pages: 335
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
three-stars

It was one dark night that brought Damon Wolfe and Sophie Parker together. They were two tortured souls, looking for escape, and they weren't supposed to see each other ever again…

Four years later, Sophie's FBI father, who is also Damon's mentor, is killed in a suspicious car crash after leaving Sophie a cryptic message to trust no one from the agency. When Damon shows up looking for her, she isn't sure if he's friend or enemy, but she knows he could easily rip apart what is left of her heart.

The last thing Damon wants is to get involved with Sophie again. It was hard enough to walk away the first time. But she's in trouble, her father's reputation is under attack, and the lives of his fellow agents are at stake if there's a traitor in their midst.

When someone starts shooting at them, they have no choice but to go on the run and off the grid. Everyone in their world becomes a suspect. They want to uncover the truth, but will it turn out to be the last thing they expect? Proving her father's innocence might just cost them their hearts…and their lives…

I get excited each time I see a new RS series and ‘Perilous Trust’ for a moment there, did get me going with a great opening, a death amidst suspicious circumstances and several parties implicated when that actually happens. Throw in an awkward ‘second-chance’ so to speak and ‘Perilous Trust’ does seem like a good mix to get into when the daughter of a dead FBI agent has her life upended and another upcoming agent who pops back into it just as things start to get messy.

But I thought that was also where storytelling faltered as well. Apart from some dialogues where characters’ speech patterns don’t seem to mirror how people actually talk, Sophie and Damon find themselves cleaning up a mess that’s caused by a peripheral (and dead) character that actually drew in quite a large cast of secondary characters and villains.

There’s also some back history of their friends and their hookup 4 years ago that felt randomly inserted into the mix, which as a result, made me feel more and more like a shipwreck survivor bobbing alone at sea than an invested party in the story clutching at anything and everything to see how it plays out. In other words, the action had ‘spiralled’ outwards so far from where we first started that it was not just difficult to get the connections down, but that I found myself becoming indifferent to them.

That for me, did take the shine off Sophie/Damon’s developing relationship and consequently, I couldn’t exactly buy into them as a couple, let alone believe that what they felt for each other could really go beyond the constructed closeness that sudden danger can bring.

This isn’t to say they aren’t likeable characters on their own though, because they are—for most part. There aren’t TSTL moments, nor random outbursts of hysterics or out-of-character childish behaviour that can tank a story for me, but I didn’t find myself on the edge of my seat or entirely anxious for Sophie/Damon to get their HEA. Perhaps it would have been easier to relate to their relationship had Barbara Freethy spent more time exploring the consequences of what they did 4 years ago but the balance of romance and suspense as always, is a difficult one to master—and please every reader as well.

‘Perilous Trust’ isn’t a bad start though and as said earlier, every new take in RS is something that gets me moist with excitement. I just wished I’d stayed moist the whole time.

three-stars
Back to top

Pin It on Pinterest