Tag: Bored boneless

City Under Siege by R.J. Prescott

City Under Siege by R.J. PrescottCity Under Siege by R.J. Prescott
Published by Amazon Digital Services, Amazon Publishing on February 19th 2018
Pages: 412
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London is a city in flames. Tensions are high and a critical situation is about to go from bad to worse. The Prime Minister wants to send a message, and the SAS will be the ones to deliver it.

Emotional detachment is my speciality. I’m ruthless and cut throat, but there is nobody better.

Sarah Tatem is an innocent. Caught up in a world in which she doesn’t belong, and trying desperately to do the right thing. My job is to keep her safe long enough to get what’s needed, and bring an end to this siege of terror.

But something has changed. I’ve learned that the only thing stronger than loyalty is love, and now she’s gone.

My name is Lieutenant Tom Harper, and I’m about to unleash hell.

‘City Under Siege’ does have an exciting premise and to be honest, I was also lured in by the cover that depicted a post-apocalyptic London which I always seem to have an unholy fascination with.

But for someone who loves romantic suspense, this was a hard book to get through, even to the midway mark. I definitely liked the plot, which (plus points given for starting out strongly) unfortunately stuttered in the middle with the action taking a lull. Add to that endless and very long dialogues—some bordering on the ridiculous—taking place in scenes that I feel weren’t especially necessary and ‘City Under Siege’ found one of its victims in me.

Perhaps these scenes were meant to know the growing bond between Tom and Sarah, or perhaps they were meant to inject some levity into a serious situation, but these ended up mostly flat for me, with some secondary characters coming in and being over-the-top ridiculous in their villainy. Consequently, I was bored boneless and struggled to the midway mark while wondering when things were going to start rolling again.

I’m not quite sure if I’m able to put a finger on it specifically, but the combination of poor editing and the constant spelling errors like ‘metal/mettle’, ‘saught/sought’, ‘discrete/discreet’ was off-putting. In addition, I thought the plot and pacing also needed more developmental work for a better flow. ‘City Under Siege’ sadly, didn’t live up to its potential for me, more so because I had high hopes after reading all the glowing reviews about it.


Take a Chance on Me by Jane Porter

Take a Chance on Me by Jane PorterTake a Chance on Me by Jane Porter
Series: Love on Chance Avenue, #3
Published by Tule Publishing on March 18th 2018
Pages: 146
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Savvy stylist Amanda Wright loves Marietta, her hair salon, and her clients, and no client is more dear to her heart than eighty-year-old Bette Justice–even if her years have made her a little fragile. So when Bette asks Amanda to help her convince her determined grandson, Tyler, a successful game designer, that Marietta is the right home for Bette, Amanda can’t say no.

Tyler Justice has a one-track mind–he wants to take care of his beloved grandmother. He can’t understand her resistance to move to Texas and is sure that the young friend she keeps mentioning–Amanda–is taking advantage of his grandmother’s generosity. He reaches Marietta determined to put the salon owner in her place and bring his grandmother home…until smart, kind Amanda starts to tug at his heart in ways he never expected.

But just as Tyler and Amanda start to form a real connection, will a long-buried family secret destroy their chance at love?

I was frankly, bored with this. Bored because I could see the conflict and the eventual resolution coming, unmoved because I couldn’t feel any chemistry between Amanda and Tyler.
Porter posits Marietta as a small but pretty base where happiness is an almost-guarantee (Tule’s publishing numerous Marietta books attest to it), so it was a given that Tyler would in the end, learn to love the place as Amanda and Bette do…there was no other option available here, because apparently Marietta was the answer to problems, so the man—who apparently is the one with the one-track mind—has to do all the compromising, when it became evident that the whole book centred around getting Tyler to see the beauty of the community that was Marietta.
In fact, I didn’t think Tyler was an arse at all, not when his way of wanting to move his grandmother somewhere else had merit which no one else would see. That Amanda pushed her own issues of her past on to Tyler rather unfairly, or that Tyler seemed to be the one always giving in made it hard to read on, especially when Tyler was the only one made to go on the uphill climb to find his own feet when everyone else sang the happy song of Marietta.
‘Take a Chance on Me’ rubbed me the wrong way early in the book and sadly, I never quite got back that sense of traction or the desire to go on.

Collision Point by Lora Leigh

Collision Point by Lora LeighCollision Point by Lora Leigh
Series: Brute Force #1
Published by St. Martin's Paperbacks on February 27th 2018
Pages: 336
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Riordan “Rory” Malone is a force to be reckoned with. A member of the Brute Force Protection Agency and an operative working with the Elite Ops, Rory is the fiercest of warriors and protectors. Honed from the strong Irish stock of their grandfather and sharpened to a razor’s edge, Malone men live for one single purpose: to protect the women who own them, body and soul. From the moment he saw Amara Resnova, he knew she could be that woman.

But Amara, daughter of an alleged notorious crime lord, is a force in her own right. When she betrays her father, she’s finds herself in the arms of a man who is dangerous for her body and soul.

Can Rory keep Amara safe while protecting his own heart? Can Amara trust Rory not to break hers even as the danger mounts, threatening to take them and their passion to a breaking point?

I had assumed that ‘Collision Point’ was the first of a new series by Lora Leigh and not part of her Elite Oops series, which I didn’t exactly take to. But while I found the start somewhat intriguing, it just wasn’t a story that could hold my interest; neither was the writing style which I found choppy, repetitive and somewhat difficult to follow.

On the one hand, there’s nothing more enticing about a male protagonist who knows what he wants and goes after it. On the other hand, there is the cookie-cutter pattern emerging here, of the growling, neanderthal male who’s built only to have rough sex and protect his mate and the helpless female who seems to run and flail at that possessive edge he shows around her. I’ll admit readily that Leigh’s ‘Wild Card’ put me off such protagonists, though ‘Collision Point’ felt marginally better as it pretty much revolved around a hero bulldozing his way through everything to get his woman back.

Structurally, I did struggle with this even from the beginning, as I tried to piece together Riordan’s and Amara’s history for the first few chapters as their backstory came in dribs and drabs, interrupted by copious descriptions of erections, wetness and coitus interruptus. Admittedly, with a sensual history between them, Riordan and Amara weren’t strangers to begin with, but instead of a constant build-up or reconstruction of their past, more than half the story was concerned with sex or how aroused either protagonist was (then spending it jealous thinking of imaginary lovers the other might have had), which did get annoyingly distracting.

My rating merely reflects my inability to continue the story—‘Collision Point’ is more like romantic suspense erotica, if there’s ever such a sub-genre. Sure, the sex is hot, but, it’s not a style that I’m used to at all (this is clearly, my preference) and frankly, I was thrown off way too much, right to the point past the halfway point where I found myself too frustrated to even get down and dirty with this pairing.

Finding Sunshine by Rene Webb

Finding Sunshine by Rene WebbFinding Sunshine by Rene Webb
Series: A Pinetree Novel #1
Published by Rene Webb on July 14th 2015
Pages: 234
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Young aspiring photographer, Nina King, is searching for a place to belong.

As her professional internship has recently ended, she’s now out of work and trying to find herself while struggling to build a viable career.

Ex-con, Aaron Masters, is searching for redemption.

When they met Nina’s smile—for a precious moment—warmed the darkness inside. Now Aaron will stop at nothing to make her his woman, keep her, and protect her from the truth of his rough past.

Will Aaron’s dark past derail the couple’s bright future?

I requested this book from Netgalley because the thought of an ex-con wanting/needing redemption just seemed too good to pass up. And the ideas of life stalling, that people need to move on as they find cracks in their lives that are difficult to smooth over—are seductive ones and so close to reality that I thought this story would actually be right up my alley.

But ‘Finding Sunshine’ just wasn’t what I expected, as it all read like a New Adult book populated with characters that just didn’t feel like they’ve grown up yet.

I couldn’t get into the them at all in fact: the instant love (or lust) which just seemed to be baseless and inexplicable to me which then led to a long period of feel-good lull of sunshine, sex and roses, the startling (and childish?) outbursts of temper that made me wonder at times about the characters’ maturity and the fight about who hooked up with whom in their friends’ group simply put me off.

I also had some difficulty separating the voices of Aaron and Nina, except for odd terms like ‘Golly’ and ‘Oh My Goddess’ which just didn’t seem to fit the entire storytelling; offhand, I do know they’re meant to be character quirks that make them distinct and maybe even adorable. Yet it threw me off and I struggled through the whole book with my reservations never quite dissipating at all towards the end.

Clearly, this is not the book for me at all.


Prince Charming by C.D. Reiss

Prince Charming by C.D. ReissPrince Charming by C.D. Reiss
Published by Everafter Romance on January 4th 2018
Pages: 421
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Keaton Bridge is exactly the kind of guy a straight-arrow like Cassie doesn’t need.

For one thing, he’s a criminal—and she fights crime for a living. And being criminally handsome isn’t helping her say no, either. Everything about him screams trouble, from his British accent to his mysterious past.

And Cassie doesn’t do trouble.

Keaton’s got his own trouble. He’s trying to go legit, and an FBI agent hanging around is the last thing that will help his credibility. All it took was one night of passion to sear her into his skin. Now he can’t imagine living happily ever after without her.

All they have to do is walk away.

But neither of them ever walks away from danger.

C.D. Reiss doesn’t often come around on my need-to-read list, but there’s no doubt her stories are stylishly written and her plots imaginative. The blurb of ‘Prince Charming’ spoke to the geek in me and the hacking, white-collar crime, the criminal and the fed were just ingredients that could and should have made a story as explosive as I’d expected.

The web Reiss wove from the beginning had a noir-ish, sometimes claustrophobic (though sexually-charged) feel to it. But if I was initially intrigued and loving the toxic, uncertain atmosphere of distrust mixed with attraction, my excitement flatlined a bit as I couldn’t see where the story was heading, except for the instant lust and the moral ambiguity that seems to be all-pervasive each time Keaton Bridge enters the picture. With every action described, every thought catalogued in a cat-and-mouse game of questions going nowhere that was perhaps meant to build suspense, but got distracting and draggy instead—oddly enough, because Cassie’s and Keaton’s attraction seemed inversely proportionate to the pacing. Cassie’s and Keaton’s to-and-fro dialogue always seemed to be heading for a stalemate (though his constant arousal and her wet panties are a separate issue entirely and rather bewildering), interrupted often by long, protracted mental musings. The point is, both of them were dodgers in so many ways and the pages and pages of dialogue and their dangerous, reckless relationship showed it.

I’m guessing that this might not be a book for everyone—the style and the introspective narrative might not be for those who prefer ‘straight-up’ writing—and I found myself on the fence about it, especially when I started getting impatient for things to roll on instead of stalling when Cassie and Keaton hit the sheets with so many questions still left unanswered. That said, the plot was well-drawn, and the details of cyber crime, the dark web and the hackers involved believably thrilling. There were some twists that I didn’t expect, carrots dangled, and like rewards for continuing to turn the pages, they were hooks that I bit into despite skimming some parts of the story.


Brave by Tammara Webber

Brave by Tammara WebberBrave by Tammara Webber
Series: Contours of the Heart #4
Published by Tammara Webber on December 17th 2017
Pages: 249
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Courage means rising up to defend your beliefs...or daring to question them.

Erin McIntyre was captivating, but forbidden. His professional subordinate. The embodiment of unearned privilege. The daughter of his sworn enemy

Isaac Maat was impossible to read. Smart, ambitious, and emotionally detached. Hotter than anyone's boss should ever be and definitely hiding something...

He told himself that getting to know her would help him take down her father. She told herself that getting under his skin would distract her wrecked heart from its misery.

Neither predicted their private war would lead to an intimate battle in which the victor would be the first one to SURRENDER.

It has been a long, long time since I’ve read a Tammara Webber book and coming back to one is a reminder of ‘Contours of the Heart’ as one of the first few books that actually made me aware of the then-emerging New Adult (sub)genre that had suddenly scored big hits with so many people.

As the rocky relationship between Isaac Maat and Erin McIntyre emerges in the first few chapters however, what I’d evidently also forgotten is Webber’s seductively poetic and perceptive writing of this pairing—particularly so for a NA story—just as her portrayal of her characters are realistic, quite multifaceted and believable, with the undertones of racial bias that sets up the conflict of the story years before Isaac and Erin are even on the scene.

These alone makes ‘Brave’ easy to go through, as Webber unravels the heroine, strips her bare, then puts her in front of the reader like a bold testament to the flawed (and young) heroine…complete with broken dreams, scorching fantasies, colossal fuck-ups and everything else in between. With only Erin’s POV available to us though, it is more difficult to figure out who Isaac really is, and my own inference in this case, coming through the filter of Erin’s own perceptions, doesn’t peel back that much. Consequently, Isaac remains relatively shrouded in mystery (and very alluringly sexy) but as unreadable and unattainable as Erin makes him out to be.

I did find myself somewhat bored for the first half—the slow burn also translates into slow pacing—as Erin and Isaac take a while to warm up to each other, then flatten out until the climax near the end and a hurried resolution that’s unsatisfactory because of its swiftness and abruptness. The romance at some points, seems to flicker out, only to return when Erin/Isaac sort out the fallout from the big reveal and this, coupled with the rushed (and only) sex scene at the end, just left me needing a lot more than a HFN conclusion.


Show Me by Abigail Strom

Show Me by Abigail StromShow Me by Abigail Strom
Series: Me
Published by Montlake Romance on January 2nd 2018
Pages: 256
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“Houston, we have a major attraction.”

After years of dealing with a heart condition and an overprotective mother, Airin Delaney is finally having her first taste of freedom in Waikiki—and it’s intoxicating. But it’s nothing compared to the out-of-this-world attraction between her and astronaut Hunter Bryce. Airin is determined to shoot for the stars and experience her first real kiss.

All Hunter has ever wanted is to explore the universe. That is, until a certain black-haired, wide-eyed beauty shakes him to the core. Hunter knows almost nothing about Airin, not even her last name. All he knows is that she’s the kind of girl he could fall over-the-moon in love with. Unfortunately, the timing couldn’t be worse. While Airin is celebrating her first night of freedom, Hunter is celebrating his last—before embarking on an eight-month mission.

It was only supposed to be one night. But sometimes that’s all fate needs to change two lives forever.

Unlike its predecessor, ‘Show Me’ is written in a very different vein—much more than just an astronaut looking to fulfil his lifelong dream beyond Earth’s atmosphere and a woman so sheltered that the whole world seems new. If ‘Tell Me’ is an opposites-attract story, ‘Show Me’ continues this trend in a different way. Unlike Caleb and Jane who are inherently different in their personalities and what they wanted out of life, Hunter and Airin are opposites in in their experiences though there’s the ironic twist of the latter having much to teach the former as well.

There was something whimsical and lofty about ‘Show Me’—I essentially thought this read like a dreamer’s book with lots of hopes that pour through the pages—where talk extended beyond present reality to interstellar travel and the inevitable rush of philosophising that comes with it. The undertones were great: the ideals of humanity vs. the pragmatism needed about reality as we know it, the long-debatable merits of space exploration, the politics that comes with it.

I wasn’t entirely thrilled though, with the extremes in Airin’s and Hunter’s experiences; too often it comes across in many books as the manwhore and the virgin trope and the inevitable comparisons of how special a heroine is in contrast to his countless other flings. And I was even less enthused about a meddling mother whose protective desperation turned so manipulative that it caused most of the rift and the push-pull dynamics in the story.

It’s not easy to rate this story nonetheless. Strom’s writing was enjoyable and there were parts that I could relate to, just as there were bits that I couldn’t, like Airin’s wide-eyed honest cataloguing of every new thing. Hunter’s and Airin’s HFN ending was given that same dreamy tinge, though the look into the future remained just that—a veiled hope that still left me wondering if this was a pairing that could weather the storms.