Series: The Summerhaven Trio

Smiling Irish by Katy Regnery

Smiling Irish by Katy RegnerySmiling Irish by Katy Regnery
Series: The Summerhaven Trio, #2
Published by Katharine Gilliam Regnery on April 1st 2018
Pages: 281
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two-stars

Tierney Haven and Burr O’Leary come from completely different worlds…

…but there’s a reason they say “opposites attract.”

Bookish Tierney Haven has always preferred places to people, and she especially loves the peace and quiet of Moonstone Manor, an estate museum located in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, where she is head docent, chief historian and live-in caretaker. The very last thing she expects to find on the doorstep at midnight is bruised and bloodied stranger, Burr O’Leary, in desperate need of her help.

Against her better judgement and at the risk of her brothers’ wrath, Tierney offers Burr sanctuary at Moonstone Manor, and nurses him back to health, surprised to discover that the dashing, enigmatic stranger loves the history and peace of Moonstone as much as she. But Burr has a dark history, and those who hurt him will stop at nothing to eliminate him...placing Tierney in grave danger until he is well enough to find them first.

Katy Regnery’s books have always been odd reads for me. There, I admitted it. Having been introduced to her works via her retelling of fairy tales, I soon cottoned on to the fact that her writing isn’t quite a contemporary one, but one that seems to have a more distinct historical/fantasy style that doesn’t sit too well at times. Call it sensitivity to context maybe, but that has thrown me off a fair bit.

‘Smiling Irish’ is one of those times.

The rather odd first meeting of Tierney and Burr aside, there was something rather anachronistic and ‘traditional’ about parts of this story that felt out of place with the contemporary setting—the vocabulary, Tierney behaving like the stammering, blushing virgin she was, her weird, almost petulant outbursts of ‘sass’ (?) and weeping with the long internal monologues that somehow reinforced this—to the extent that I half expected most of the characters to dress in flowing gowns or rough linen. Not that I have a problem with virginity at all, but I’ve yet to read enough kick-arse types who really make a big, big show out of it. Mostly however, I think virgin heroines – Tierney being the perfect example of this – are too often portrayed as the damsel in distress, shackled either by their sexual inexperience or by some other fears that are somehow inexplicably linked to an intact hymen.

Regnery made a big deal of the Irish heritage here and much of the behaviour of the characters was attributed to ‘Irishness’ supposedly, which made me think that the rest of the population wouldn’t act like this because they weren’t ‘Irish’. The use of Irish (Gaelic) as well, became a point of contention for me when after a while, it felt as though Regnery inserted the language along with its translation needlessly, almost as if to show that research had been done on it and it had to appear in the writing no matter what the circumstance.

The long and short it is, ‘Smiling Irish’ wasn’t a good fit for me for a weird number of reasons, context and style perhaps, playing the biggest parts in my inability to enjoy the story. It isn’t to say that Regnery doesn’t appeal at all—I’m pretty sure this is my own quirk rearing its head here but I’m probably better off sticking to her fairytale retellings.

two-stars