Series: Modern Love

The Right Swipe by Alisha Rai

The Right Swipe by Alisha RaiThe Right Swipe by Alisha Rai
Series: Modern Love, #1
Published by Avon on 2nd July 2019
Pages: 400
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
two-stars

Rhiannon Hunter may have revolutionized romance in the digital world, but in real life she only swipes right on her career—and the occasional hookup. The cynical dating app creator controls her love life with a few key rules:
- Nude pics are by invitation only
- If someone stands you up, block them with extreme prejudice
- Protect your heart

Only there aren't any rules to govern her attraction to her newest match, former pro-football player Samson Lima. The sexy and seemingly sweet hunk woos her one magical night... and disappears.

Rhi thought she'd buried her hurt over Samson ghosting her, until he suddenly surfaces months later, still big, still beautiful—and in league with a business rival. He says he won't fumble their second chance, but she's wary. A temporary physical partnership is one thing, but a merger of hearts? Surely that’s too high a risk…

In a thoroughly contemporary take on 21st century dating, Alisha Rai takes on the lingo that have slowly but surely become entrenched in dating-speak— ghosting, hooking up, dick pics, one-night stands, casual relationships, swiping right—and waves a story around it, along with the cynicism, the bouncing around and the jadedness that come along with the reality of finding the ‘right’ match.

From a hookup to a ghosting to a meeting as business rivals, Samson Lima and Rhiannon Hunter meet again when the former has every intention of buying up a rival’s dating company…just as the latter is stepping into said company as a favour for his aunt.

Rhiannon is a strutting, ball-busting shark through and through, a hard entrepreneur with a vendetta who’d made her way to the top and in some ways, a man-eater who takes no prisoners, more ironically so since she’s the founder of a wildly popular dating app for women.

But hell hath no fury like a woman scorned and Rhiannon’s steam-out-the-ears, full-on thoughts showed it, as she rocked out with bluster and claws extended trying to show that Samson’s ghosting didn’t hurt when it did. Still, she came across as petulant, hell bent on being detached, unforgiving and unkind, sometimes emotionally juvenile in her inability to let things go—all of which so that she’ll never have to feel weak and vulnerable anymore. Understandable, though these were qualities that didn’t seem to be at all attractive or redeeming as the story wore on.

Samson came through as the sweeter, yearning, milder one—it felt like he *had* to be one, given the kind of ‘heroine’ Rai had chosen to portray from the beginning—and I actually started and ended it all not just feeling sorry for him, but frustrated that he was constantly facing an uphill battle trying to convince her he was worth another shot while she simply stood there, twiddled her thumbs and punished him for his entire gender’s sins.

The whole point is, I’m not so sure if I’m on the boat with this role reversal, especially if the point is yet again, to show in the written word how women can do things equal or better than men and have it shoved down my throat in the abrasive, disaffected, trust-no-one form of Rhiannon Hunter.

I wish I could say that it was a story that grew on me but it didn’t exactly. Not quite. It got bogged down in the middle as Rhiannon and Samson circled around each other, skimming the surface but never quite going deeper as the Rhi’s trust issues kept flaring up while Samson tried to ease his way around it. Rinse and repeat.

Yet objectively speaking, ‘The Right Swipe’ a brilliant take on the app dating scene vs. the traditional dating one and all the thorny issues that surround it. In fact, Rai tackles it quite smartly, with conversations that range from tart and witty to penetrating and questioning, to the interconnected themes of women in business, to the existing patriarchy, sexual harassment and simply, the lengths people go to to protect themselves. I do think many readers would like Rai’s feminist take on it—it does champion women doing whatever the hell they want when it comes to dating and sex after all—just as I know my disappointment with the book makes me the minority here.

two-stars

The Boxer by Piper Rayne

The Boxer by Piper RayneThe Boxer by Piper Rayne
Series: Modern Love #2
Published by Amazon Digital Services, Amazon Publishing on March 1st 2017
Pages: 199
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Goodreads
three-stars

What does a girl do after she discovers her fiancé is a cheating bastard?

In my case, I performed the ritual implosion of all scorned women. I drowned my sorrows in cases of white wine, wallowed in gallons of ice cream, and ignited a bonfire to burn away every damn remnant of his existence. Six months later, the only result was a permanent impression of my ass on the couch.

Adventure Dating my friends dared.
A new and exciting opportunity they said.

I thought they were crazy, but I’m not one to back down from a challenge, so I signed up for the entire four-week deal.
That’s where I saw HIM. Lucas Cummings. He isn’t the classic rich boy I usually end up with. The one whose idea of working up a sweat is waiting for his margarita to be served beachside. Nope. He’s a rough and tough bad boy that all fathers warn their daughters about. You know the type. Cocky swagger, chiseled jaw—the ‘V’.

SOLD, I said to myself, until I discovered he was so much more than just a BOXER.

Left Hook.
Right to the heart.

Prim girl meets supposed bad boy at a boxing ring, bets on him inadvertently and get her knickers wet, but one embarrassment after another follows and the promise of a sultry night to come screeches prematurely to a halt. Well, there’s a little more than that of course, as ‘class conflict’ and shades of infidelity and deception are written into the plot…and who the rough-and-tumble boxer really is, isn’t quite who we can expect.

I’m not entirely too sure how to rate my first ever read by Piper Rayne, to be honest. As a story written solely in Tahlia’s POV, I felt as though this became a case of a completely unveiled heroine – we know her flaws, her insecurities and her hopes – but almost nothing about Lucas Cummings, except for the bare facts that he lets her know about him, as revealed to us by the authors. That Lucas remains tight-lipped about what he does and who he really is didn’t make him a character that I could understand, let alone connect with. Eventually, it all comes to a head, forming the bulk of the conflict, yet I couldn’t shrug away the dissatisfied feel when Lucas seemed to stay an enigma who was content to dole out only the pieces of himself that he wanted people to know.

I personally prefer both the H/hr to be stripped bare – not just physically and not only at the end of the book – so this was a story that left me somewhat frustrated and sitting on the fence. With their emotional connection and compatibility overshadowed by their physical chemistry (this is way too common these days), I turned the last page actually wondering whether Lucas/Tahlia would actually be a couple who could even last beyond the HFN that Rayne gives us.

three-stars