Series: London Celebrities

Making Up by Lucy Parker

Making Up by Lucy ParkerMaking Up by Lucy Parker
Series: London Celebrities #3
Published by Carina Press on May 28th 2018
Pages: 318
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three-stars

Once upon a time, circus artist Trix Lane was the best around. Her spark vanished with her confidence, though, and reclaiming either has proved…difficult. So when the star of The Festival of Masks is nixed and Trix is unexpectedly thrust into the spotlight, it’s exactly the push she needs. But the joy over her sudden elevation in status is cut short by a new hire on the makeup team.

Leo Magasiva: disgraced wizard of special effects. He of the beautiful voice and impressive beard. Complete dickhead and—in an unexpected twist—an enragingly good kisser.

To Leo, something about Trix is…different. Lovely. Beautiful, even though the pint-size, pink-haired former bane of his existence still spends most of her waking hours working to annoy him. They’ve barely been able to spend two minutes together for years, and now he can’t get enough of her. On stage. At home. In his bed.

When it comes to commitment, Trix has been there, done that, never wants to do it again. Leo’s this close to the job of a lifetime, which would take him away from London—and from Trix. Their past is a constant barrier between them.

It seems hopeless.

Utterly impossible.

And yet…

I don’t have much experience with reading Lucy Parker’s books, but ‘Making Up’s enemies-to-lovers blurb drew me right in.

I loved the chaotic opening that was full of sensory delights mixed with the drama that happens both onstage and offstage—that’s what you get for sinking the story straight into one of Westend’s best runs, complete with the out-of-the-world costumes, death-defying acts, impossible characters and finally, the stripped-down actors behind them.

Parker paints stunning pictures with words, no doubt, with so much of the side-of-your-mouth kind of humour here both dry and witty—blink and it’s gone—that ups the pace and makes the pages fly. Even the antagonism between Trix and Leo fell into romcom land as they traded barbs with the frenemies vibe and slung such spirited snarky insults that I was tempted to steal some those in order to expand my own swearing vocabulary.

I did like Parker’s chosen setting of performance art, and the support that went on behind the scenes…Trix and Leo were the furthest from the typical stock characters you see in romance these days and that alone kept me reading. Quirk aside (and there’s quite a fair bit of it that can be funny, if the humour and writing do appeal), I still sort of had a hard time trying to place where ‘Making Up’ fell on my personal ratings spectrum.

It’s far from a bad read, but there were parts that I felt were stylistically overdone: the constant hyperboles and the smart cracks could have been dialled back a wee bit, which, combined with a full boatload of drama—don’t expect any less from the theatre people—nearly caved my head in. The pygmy hedgehog however, was the extra special sparkle in all of it.

three-stars