Publisher: Mimi Boutique

Digging a Hole by Mimi Jean Pamfiloff

Digging a Hole by Mimi Jean PamfiloffDigging a Hole by Mimi Jean Pamfiloff
Series: OHellNo, #3
Published by Mimi Boutique on 19th June 2018
Pages: 173
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three-stars

HE’S THE MEANEST BOSS EVER.SHE’S THE SWEET SHY INTERN.THEY’RE ABOUT TO WRECK EACH OTHER CRAZY.

My name is Sydney Lucas. I am smart, deathly shy, and one-hundred percent determined to make my own way in the world. Which is why I jumped at the chance to intern for Mr. Nick Brooks despite his reputation. After ten failed interviews at other companies, he was the only one offering. Plus, everyone says he knows his stuff and surely a man as stunningly handsome as him can’t be “the devil incarnate,” right? Wrong.

Oh…that man. That freakin’ man has got to go! I’ve been on the job one week, and he’s insulted my mother, wardrobe shamed me, and managed to make me cry. Twice. Underneath that stone-cold, beautiful face is the evilest human being ever. But I’m not going to quit. Oh no. For once in my life, I’ve got to make a stand. Only every time I open my mouth, I can’t quite seem to muster the courage. Perhaps my revenge needs to come in another form: destroying him quietly.

Because I’ve got a secret. I’m not really just an intern, and Sydney Lucas isn’t my real name.

There’s always a bizarre lick to Mimi Jean Pamfiloff’s stories that I can’t seem to shake off each time I begin a book of hers. ‘Digging a Hole’ isn’t too different, where in alternating chapters, the flashback story of a crazy-arse tycoon tries to kidnap his own family and subject them to naked yoga is recounted. Add this to the general storyline of Georgie Walton/Sydney Lucas applying incognito for an internship within her family’s company under a mean, lean boss a few months later, the crazy does go a few notches up.

But I’ll admit that my challenge with a Pamfiloff read is always sifting the good from the insane. And as a large part of the story had to do with what happened a few months prior to Sydney/Georgie working for Nick, well, that bit came off as the least believable.

So needless to say, ‘Digging a Hole’ started off zany.

Georgie banked on the fact that she was invisible to people, without a fake identity or social security card—because it was glossed over. On the other hand, Nick Brooks had no sweet side. He abused, she cowered. He insulted, she cried, even if it was deliberate bullying as a test to see if she stood up for herself. But when all was finally untangled, their convoluted, complicated relationship merely showed the gap (in every sense of the word) between Georgie and Nick, especially the former’s naïveté and at-times juvenile behaviour, with some cringe-worthy scenes that I actually wished didn’t happen.

I did think that the characterisation of Georgie/Nick was shaky though, and them blowing hot and cold didn’t make it easy to get a grasp on either Georgie or Nick who seemed like 2 entirely different people by the time I was three-quarter way through the story.

The long and short of it is, if Pamfiloff dialled down the zany in her writing, I really think I could have liked this a lot more. Fiction obviously calls for the suspension of disbelief, but every Pamfiloff book that I’ve read swings back and forth between being absorbing and plain mad while aiming to keep a rom-com lightness to everything—just sometimes makes it impossible to do so. That she’s got some gems of insights, unexpected twists and some good ol’ writing for a solid plot cushioned in between made the book worth it for me, though I really wished these took centre stage instead of the over-the-top weirdness that hit me full-frontal.

Essentially, ‘Digging a Hole’ got good halfway through, as the odd bits finally, finally got left behind and the real thing kicked in, when the title finally made so much sense. I’m glad I pushed through to finish this.

three-stars

Pawn by Mimi Jean Pamfiloff

Pawn by Mimi Jean PamfiloffPawn by Mimi Jean Pamfiloff
Series: Mr. Rook's Island #2
Published by Mimi Boutique on October 30th 2017
Pages: 266
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three-stars

SHE KNOWS HE'S BAD. THE QUESTION IS, HOW BAD?Stephanie Fitzgerald is nobody's pawn. Determined to discover the truth about a missing loved one, she lands a job at the world's most exclusive resort, working for the only man with the answers--Mr. Rook. He's shockingly handsome, thoroughly intimidating, and completely off-limits.

But the truth she seeks isn't black and white, and Mr. Rook is a far more dangerous temptation than she ever knew.

Will Stephanie resist her desires, or will she be lured into Mr. Rook's world of hidden sins?

I think Mimi Jean Pamfiloff’s Mr Rook’s Island series is one of the more bizarre reads I’ve ever come across in the romance genre at least. Like a mix of the old tv series Fantasy Island (whose protagonist’s name even resembles Mr. Rook), Survivor and Stephen King’s horror stuff with some gothic elements thrown in, ‘Pawn’ pretty much continues in the vein of the female protagonist who pokes around an island that promises every fantasy come to life.

And that’s where the fun and doubts start, because nothing is as it ever seems, period.

Written wholly in Stephanie’s POV, the reader, in the same boat as Stephanie, falls down the rabbit hole into places that take on a life of their own and with people who never quite tell the truth, though it’s unclear when and what they’re lying about. In the centre of the maelstrom itself is the mysterious enigmatic James Rook, with whom Stephanie feels a strange connection yet can’t fully trust. Dreams and nightmares start to meld into reality and you, like Stephanie, start wondering how loopy things can get before it starts to break down.

I’d initially thought that the first book was merely suspense, but ‘Pawn’ makes it clear that there is a strong paranormal element that runs through this series. There are certainly some questions answered—questions that I had from the very start—though even more remain, with several loose plot ends that the cliffhanger ending quite annoyingly leaves hanging.

As with the first book, I’m not entirely certain how to rate this one. There’re the combinations of the sacred and the profane running throughout here, so perhaps this step into the forbidden (in so many ways) and the weird paranormal is what makes the the book a hard one to put down. At the same time, it’s hard to really ‘like’ the pairing with a distrustful and flaky female lead by the time ‘Pawn’ ends and Rook’s lack of transparency, just when you think they’ve kind of found their HEA. So maybe this 3-starred rating is an arbitrary one (I’ve honestly never quite done this before), just because Pamfiloff is managing to keep me so off-centre with this.

three-stars