Publisher: Mia Sheridan

Savaged by Mia Sheridan

Savaged by Mia SheridanSavaged by Mia Sheridan
Published by Mia Sheridan on 28th May 2019
Pages: 349
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three-half-stars

When wilderness guide, Harper Ward, is summoned to the small town sheriff’s office in Helena Springs, Montana, to provide assistance on a case, she is shocked to find that their only suspect in the double murder investigation is a man described as a savage.

But the longer she watches the man known only as Lucas, on the station surveillance camera, the more intrigued she becomes. He certainly looks primitive with his unkempt appearance and animal skin attire, but she also sees intelligence in his eyes, sensitivity in his expression. Who is he? And how is it possible that he’s lived alone in the forest since he was a small child?

As secrets begin to emerge, Harper is thrust into something bigger and more diabolical than she ever could have imagined. And standing right at the center of it all, is Lucas. But is he truly the wild man he appears to be? A cold blooded killer? An innocent victim? Or a perplexing mix of all three?

Harper must find out the answers to these questions because the more time she spends with him, the more she risks losing her heart.

‘Savaged’ is an interesting read, to say the least, with an intriguing and a deliberately contextless start, but a slight, sagging middle that pulled the momentum of the plot development down a little. But Mia Sheridan has hopped on a trope that I like: the savage man and the civilised woman, so to speak and it wasn’t a hard decision to pick the book up despite some bad experiences I’ve had with her past books.

Jak’s story is told in fragmented bits, where past and present slowly come together in alternating chapters until it all gets caught up in the present. His meeting with Harper is serendipitous in some way, but made more so because of the rose-tinted sheen that Sheridan’s writing takes on particularly in ‘Savaged’: a mix of purple prose with long, long, descriptive inner monologues and descriptive paragraphs where star-crossed characters can almost mind-read others’ thoughts without much effort, sometimes to the point that it crosses into disbelief.

Honestly, it’s the kind of writing that I’m more familiar with in Sheridan’s arguably best-known work ‘Archer’s voice’ and in this respect, Jak/Harper’s story is a standout on its own because it’s just as unusual. As engaging as the early chapters were however, Jak’s background did feel at times, far-fetched (there’s just so far one can run with the social experimentation trope) and my scepticism often warred with the struggle to accept the plausibility of it.

But it’s clearly a case of ‘just me’ here when it comes to Sheridan’s writing style and the pattern of the storytelling and ‘Savaged’ still remains one of the better ones I’ve read from this author.

three-half-stars