Author: Nalini Singh

Wolf Rain by Nalini Singh

Wolf Rain by Nalini SinghWolf Rain by Nalini Singh
Series: Psy-Changeling Trinity, #3, #3, Psy-Changeling #18
Published by Berkley on 4th June 2019
Pages: 416
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
three-half-stars

The end of Silence was supposed to create a better world for future generations. But trust is broken, and the alliance between Psy, Changeling, and human is thin. The problems that led to Silence are back in full force. Because Silence fixed nothing, just hid the problems.

This time, the Psy have to find a real answer to their problems–if one exists. Or their race will soon go extinct in a cascade of violence. The answer begins with an empath who is attuned to monsters–and who is going to charm a wolf into loving her despite his own demons.

Nalini Singh’s über-popular Psy-Changeling series probably needs no introduction that far gone into its second series, set in the future when the Trinity Accord has been signed and a cautious peace has settled amongst the three races populating an alternate version of Earth.

The Psy-Changeling verse has expanded so much by this point that it’s practically impossible to jump into and rush through ‘Wolf Rain’ as a standalone. By and large, I did think Singh handled most aspects of the sheer size/weight of her own intricate world-building quite deftly here: the precarious juggle between the bonds of pack and romance and the weighted history that the races have, the larger, wider implications of the collapsing Psy-Net, the latent and new threats and the supporting characters who still have dedicated scenes for readers who can’t let them go.

‘Wolf Rain’ deals with the subtleties of the Psy, or rather, the subtleties of the Empaths who’d been cast aside who rose to prominence after the fall of Silence with the introduction of a rather aggravating, loud-broadcasting captive Empath Psy who simply doesn’t fit the designation E to a tee. After a quick look at other changeling groups in the first two books of this new season however, ‘Wolf Rain’ for this reason, feels oddly like a return to, or at least, a lateral expansion of the Snowdancer/Dark River-centric books where changelings shifters mostly get paired by with their former Psy enemies. Alexei Vasiliev Harte finds his mate in Memory here (battling a serial-killer at the same time) while sub-plots push forward the ongoing story of Psy-life after Trinity.

Every path is a hard-fought one, on the personal and the collective level—reflected by the longer than usual narrative—and needless to say, Alexei/Memory’s one is also a push-pull based on experience, insecurity and fear. Admittedly, this is a pairing that didn’t enthral me as much as Singh’s other couples and as a romance, didn’t quite live up to other pairings that had moved me a lot more…so this sort of impacted my rating of the overall story nonetheless.

Still, I liked the nuanced exploration of the fascinating PsyNet that draws so much from facets of computer networking and meta systems and that alone perhaps, makes ‘Wolf Rain’ worth it.

three-half-stars

Rebel Hard by Nalini Singh

Rebel Hard by Nalini SinghRebel Hard by Nalini Singh
Series: Hard Play #2
Published by TKA Distribution on 18th September 2018
Pages: 409
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
two-half-stars

Nayna Sharma agreed to an arranged marriage in the hope it would heal the fractures in her beloved family… only to realize too late that a traditional marriage is her personal nightmare. Panicked, she throws caution to the winds, puts on the tiniest dress she can find, and ends up in the arms of a tall, rough-edged hunk of a man who has abs of steel—and who she manages to mortally insult between one kiss and the next.

Abandoned as a child, then adopted into a loving family, Raj Sen believes in tradition, in continuity. Some might call him stiff and old-fashioned, but he knows what he wants—and it’s a life defined by rules… yet he can’t stop thinking about the infuriating and sexy woman who kissed him in the moonlight then disappeared. When his parents spring an introduction on him, the last woman he expects is her.

Beautiful. Maddening. A rulebreaker in the making.

He’s all wrong for her. She’s all wrong for him. And love is about to make rebels of them both.

Nalini Singh gives us a slice of the unique Fijian/Kiwi Indian culture in ‘Rebel Hard’ where strongly-held Indian traditions grudgingly meet the modern (and supposedly declining) standards of modern dating.

And for many who love diversity and the cultural spotlight Singh shines here, ‘Rebel Hard’ is the book to go to.

The weight of family expectations is pushed hard on Nayna Sharma’s shoulders, more so after her rebellious sister broke her parents’ hearts but Raj Sen—the chosen one and the very one she rebels against even though her body says otherwise—is determined to woo her until she caves. The rest really, are just the details…and there are tons of those to soak in, like a visual feast that after a while, did get a bit too much.

Yet getting down to ‘Rebel Hard’ turned out to be a bit of a mixed bag for me. Some parts read like a documentary almost and others, like a perfectly choreographed Bollywood show, of a culture that stands so differently on its own: the blindingly colourful saris and the vibrant multicolours that I associate with the big weddings, to the arranged marriages and the rom-com that Singh writes into the gaps of these dearly-held institutions.

There’s a strange mix I guess, of the fine lines drawn, the boundaries that can be overstepped and those that can’t (or shouldn’t) in the world of arranged marriages—something so foreign to me—but a whole lot of repetitiveness as well, of saris and cooking and talking about all and naught, of beading nipples and soaked panties.

In short, I suspect this would have worked better as a novella for me: it started out sparkling and fun, then flattened out somewhat near the middle onwards, where the forward momentum just got lost in the tangle of yet more colourful clothing, indecision and the two-steps-forward-one-step-back type of dance.

two-half-stars

Ocean Light by Nalini Singh

Ocean Light by Nalini SinghOcean Light by Nalini Singh
Published by Berkley on 12th June 2018
Pages: 416
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
four-stars

Security specialist Bowen Knight has come back from the dead. But there's a ticking time bomb in his head: a chip implanted to block telepathic interference that could fail at any moment--taking his brain along with it. With no time to waste, he should be back on land helping the Human Alliance. Instead, he's at the bottom of the ocean, consumed with an enigmatic changeling...

Kaia Luna may have traded in science for being a chef, but she won't hide the facts of Bo's condition from him or herself. She's suffered too much loss in her life to fall prey to the dangerous charm of a human who is a dead man walking. And she carries a devastating secret Bo could never imagine...

But when Kaia is taken by those who mean her deadly harm, all bets are off. Bo will do anything to get her back--even if it means striking a devil's bargain and giving up his mind to the enemy...

I’ve always had a soft spot for Bowen Knight, even loved his cause and his unwavering, determined fight for humanity in the Human Alliance (guess which one I belong to?)—the least of the three races it seems, in Nalini Singh’s Psy-Changeling world. My heart sank when Bo went down hard in ‘Silver Silence’ and just as I thought all hope was lost, ‘Ocean Light’ became my own (and Bo’s) salvation. This was the book I’ve always wanted ever since Bowen burst onto the scene, from the moment I learned that he had an immovable but lethal chip in his head about to detonate any time.

That Singh chooses to introduce Blacksea using Bowen’s story is an obvious shift away from the Bear changelings in ‘Silver Silence’, a mysterious group hinted at in the closing books of Singh’s “season 1” of her Psy-Changeling novels that focused solely on the cats and the wolves. Here, Singh opens yet again new pathways and original insights into her massive world-building that continues now deep down in the sea, so compelling in ways that it’s hard to turn away from the myriad of sea creatures and their personalities that populate this book. Half the book however, after the intriguing setup, comprises Singh’s languid, thorough exploration of the world Bo has found himself in, not least the slow unfurling and the slow romance between him and Kaia, before the pace picks up frantically again towards the end.

Written into Kaia Luna’s and Bowen Knight’s attraction is a conflict that’s drawn up against these lines: the bad blood between the humans the Blacksea changelings rather than just a personal feud that Kaia sets up against Bowen for the losses in she feels keenly in her life. Enemies-to-lovers in this context, might just seem a little too dismissive after all, too small a view to take in the huge world that Singh has written, though this is still a trope nonetheless, in romantic fiction which I like a lot.

Yet Kaia, a scientist-turned-cook (with maternal instincts and a soft, easily hurt heart that’s prone more to pulling away) in the Ryujin BlackSea Station, is the last person I’d expect Singh to pair with the hard security chief, who is as ruthless and emotionless as the Psy themselves without the telekinetic power. Coupled with the (somewhat unbelievable) bit of instalove written into a strong attraction—cue bodies hardening, arousal flaring—that strikes the both of them at first glance is perhaps also an attempt to humanise the hard-nosed image of Bowen Knight who is more a man of flesh and emotions more similar to the other alpha changelings than we think. I would have loved a stronger, harder, a more sword-wielding-type mate for Bo—the type that would have stood for his fight in the Human Alliance by his side with a weapon— but clearly this is my personal preference speaking for such heroines to materialise every time.

‘Ocean Light’ is satisfying on many levels, but I particularly loved the introduction to the Blacksea changelings and Bowen’s Knights. The threads of this incredibly complex arc that Singh has written are far from tied up, nonetheless. There are still too many unrevealed secrets here—things that Singh doesn’t choose to reveal—that baby steps seem to be the only way in which this juggernaut of a story can move on, which is both as rewarding and as frustrating at times.

four-stars

Cherish Hard by Nalini Singh

Cherish Hard by Nalini SinghCherish Hard by Nalini Singh
Series: Hard Play #1
Published by TKA Distribution on November 14th 2017
Pages: 297
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
four-stars

Sailor Bishop has only one goal for his future – to create a successful landscaping business. No distractions allowed. Then he comes face-to-face and lips-to-lips with a woman who blushes like an innocent… and kisses like pure sin.

Ísa Rain craves a man who will cherish her, aches to create a loving family of her own. Trading steamy kisses with a hot gardener in a parking lot? Not the way to true love. Then a deal with the devil (aka her CEO-mother) makes Ísa a corporate VP for the summer. Her main task? Working closely with a certain hot gardener.

And Sailor Bishop has wickedness on his mind.

As Ísa starts to fall for a man who makes her want to throttle and pounce on him at the same time, she knows she has to choose – play it safe and steady, or risk all her dreams and hope Sailor doesn’t destroy her heart.

‘Cherish Hard’ is my first venture into Nalini Singh contemporary romance and I hadn’t known at all what to expect, being familiar as I am only with her psy-changeling series. Having also not read ‘Rock Hard’, of which ‘Cherish Hard’ is an off-shoot or spin-off or at least a prequel to Gabriel Bishop’s story, Sailor’s and Ísa’s story is nevertheless a standalone, which takes place a few years prior Gabe’s book.

What I hadn’t expected was a quirky style that’s unlike Singh’s driving, more epic world-building style found in the psy-changeling series, set in a cosy corner of Auckland as a ambitious landscaper pursues the woman he has in mind to the very end, with a whole lot of charm and sweetness. That younger man/older woman dynamic (or at least the stigma associated with it) is thankfully not drawn out too much; what Singh chooses to expand upon is that their ages put them at different points in their life—Sailor is busy building on his ambitions and his business and presumably has no time for anything else, while Ísa is looking for stability and a family.

But while this is the main conflict that the whole narrative seems to be moving towards, the inevitability of a large blow-up and a temporary break-up as found in too many romances is actually staved off by ‘adulting’ behaviour: Sailor and Ísa confide their fears in each other, talk it out and stick together on the road ahead of them.

‘Cherish Hard’ has made me want to check out Singh’s other contemporary romances but this spin-off that she is doing of the Bishop brothers is one that I know I want more of already.

four-stars

Silver Silence by Nalini Singh

Silver Silence by Nalini SinghSilver Silence by Nalini Singh
Series: Psy-Changeling Trinity #1
Published by Berkley Books on June 13th 2017
Pages: 423
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
five-stars

Precision. Family. These are the principles that drive Silver Mercant. At a time when the fledgling Trinity Accord seeks to unite a divided world, with Silver playing a crucial role as director of a worldwide emergency response network, wildness and chaos are the last things she needs in her life. But that's exactly what Valentin Nikolaev, alpha of the StoneWater bears, brings with him. Valentin has never met a more fascinating woman. Though Silver is ruled by Silence--her mind clear of all emotion--Valentin senses a whisper of fire around her. That's what keeps him climbing apartment buildings to be near her. But when a shadow assassin almost succeeds in poisoning Silver, the stakes become deadly serious...and Silver finds herself in the heart of a powerful bear clan. Her would-be assassin has no idea what their poison has unleashed...

It’s impossible to go into any of the Psy-Changeling books and not get blown away by the intricately detailed, futuristic world that Nalini Singh has shaped over the past 15 books. ‘Silver Silence’ is Silver Mercant’s story, the stoic, emotionless psy who finally meets her match in the Valentin Nikolaev the bear alpha and their epic romance—from wary suspicion to brief happiness to heartbreak—feels like a great love story unfolding amidst a shifting world that’s hurtling towards an unknown future.

The book isn’t a standalone, but admittedly, it can function as one especially if you don’t exactly wish to go through the first 15 books of the series to get to this point and half the title itself is the name of a mysterious psy who has appeared as Kaleb Krychek’s tough, capable but emotionless aide in the past few books. After ‘Allegiance of Honor’ closed the previous arc, Silver’s story heralds in a new age, so to speak, ushering in Psy-Changeling’s “season 2” and focusing on a period where all three races look towards unity as they seek to heal their deeply-fractured world.

In fact, ‘Silver Silence’ takes up the complicated threads from the end of the last book and adds even more layers to this shifting world that inexorably hurtles towards an unknown future even as new and recurring characters find their mates. It also feel like a reboot of the series that is making me feel the excitement I haven’t felt in forever when a good book comes along.

There are light-hearted moments as there are heart-wrenching ones and while I felt overwhelmed by the details at times as ‘Silver Silence’ kicks the action all back up into high gear, it’s hard not to look back at every turn and wonder just how far we’ve come since the first book. I laughed so hard at Singh’s introduction of the Bear changelings—their irrational behaviour that still somehow endears people to them above all—and loved every moment detailing how different they seemed to the rest of the changelings and pretty much fell for this bear clan as I did the wolves. There’s also renewed focus on the Human Alliance (though there’s already some gutting tragedy here!) which I hope will play a bigger role in the upcoming books and I simply can’t wait to see how far Singh goes to integrate these races in this new age.

Singh pits opposing characters here as she normally does in her stories—an emotional, primal changeling with a psy conditioned for absolute control—but adds an intriguing history behind the distinguished Mercant family line and the Stonewater clan that makes Silver’s and Valentin’s story so much more than just an opposite-attracts kind of story. The type of pairing isn’t new (a psy with an alpha changeling) but Singh’s storytelling never gets dull here, because Silver/Valentin’s relationship is tied so deeply to the instability during the Age of Trinity yet isn’t compromised by the unfolding of events. It’s also deftly handled such that it’s hard not to root for both Silver and Valentin, who are well-matched and unwavering when it comes to loyalty and desire, as they show the same kind of determination to be with each other no matter the circumstance. Their conflict and their different stances on sex (the virgin vs the experienced male) aren’t simply written for the sake of adhering to a particular romance-novel format, but rather the history of these races explains why Silver/Valentin behave the way they do and does actually lend a measure of credibility for readers who like challenging these well-established romance tropes.

After having gotten the rather fierce affirmation of Silver/Valentin’s HEA, to finish the first ‘episode’ of the new season is akin to waking up rudely to reality and the garish morning light, making you want to crawl back into the reading cave for the sequel…which isn’t yet on the horizon.

five-stars

Allegiance of Honor by Nalini Singh

Allegiance of Honor by Nalini SinghAllegiance of Honor by Nalini Singh
Series: Psy-Changeling, #15
Published by Berkley on June 14th 2016
Pages: 478
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
two-stars

The Psy-Changeling world has undergone a staggering transformation and now stands at a crossroads. The Trinity Accord promises a new era of cooperation between disparate races and groups. It is a beacon of hope held together by many hands: Old enemies. New allies. Wary loners.
But a century of distrust and suspicion can’t be so easily forgotten and threatens to shatter Trinity from within at any moment. As rival members vie for dominance, chaos and evil gather in the shadows and a kidnapped woman’s cry for help washes up in San Francisco, while the Consortium turns its murderous gaze toward a child who is the embodiment of change, of love, of piercing hope: A child who is both Psy…and changeling.
To find the lost, protect the vulnerable—and save Trinity—no one can stand alone. This is a time of loyalty across divisions, of bonds woven into the heart and the soul, of heroes known and unknown standing back to back and holding the line. But is an allegiance of honor even possible with traitors lurking in their midst?

Knowing that Nalini Singh’s Psy-Changelings series is so beloved by many readers – me included – makes this review doubly hard to write. To say that ‘Allegiance of Honour’ is a disappointment is in itself so incredibly difficult to do, because I’d hope this ensemble cast of a book would have been the crowning glory of the Psy-changeling series.

I remember the wonder that overcame me when I tore through ‘Slave to Sensation’, ‘Caressed by Ice’, ‘Kiss of Snow’ and several others which have long become my favourites, loving how this rich universe expanded and grew as Singh revealed an expansive vision of a near-future world torn and divided along lines that went beyond ethnicity or religion.

But maybe it’s time to throw in the towel.

Because what I’d expected of the close of this ‘season’ fell far short of my hopes. Instead, ‘Allegiance of Honor’s’ narrative was too scattered, too bloated and too unfocused as every single character flitted in and out of the huge mythos that Singh has built, as they each gave an update of what has been happening to them in the interim months or years. Not having read all of the books in the series, there were chunks of this story I didn’t understand nor could find myself interested in, which, needless to say, makes ‘Allegiance of Honor’ a book that isn’t a standalone, nor a story that is for everyone. While I loved every scene (as few as there were) with Hawke and Sienna and the wolves, everything else soon became fair game – pun unintended – when it came to filling the space of this huge story that didn’t really go anywhere but merely solidified the key players in the story, the key players in the next season of the series as well as what has already happened…ad nauseum.

Many of these characters’ happy lives after their books have been already filled in the space of my own imagination and even if it’s lovely to see the multiple HEAs come to fruition, perhaps this rather effusive and over-extended epilogue had gone on long enough.

two-stars

Shards of Hope by Nalini Singh

Shards of Hope by Nalini SinghShards of Hope by Nalini Singh
Series: Psy-Changeling #14
Published by Berkley Hardcover on June 2nd 2015
Pages: 483
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
four-stars

Awakening wounded in a darkened cell, their psychic abilities blocked, Aden and Zaira know they must escape. But when the lethal soldiers break free from their mysterious prison, they find themselves in a harsh, inhospitable landscape far from civilization. Their only hope for survival is to make it to the hidden home of a predatory changeling pack that doesn’t welcome outsiders.
And they must survive. A shadowy enemy has put a target on the back of the Arrow squad, an enemy that cannot be permitted to succeed in its deadly campaign. Aden will cross any line to keep his people safe for this new future, where even an assassin might have hope of a life beyond blood and death and pain. Zaira has no such hope. She knows she’s too damaged to return from the abyss. Her driving goal is to protect Aden, protect the only person who has ever come back for her no matter what.
This time, even Aden’s passionate determination may not be enough—because the emotionless chill of Silence existed for a reason. For the violent, and the insane, and the irreparably broken…like Zaira.

The Psy-Changeling universe is expanding and this already-dense world’s expansion is never clearer than in ‘Shards of Hope’, the longest and possibly the most comprehensive sum-up of the leopard-wolf-arrow story arc in the post-Silence era. A dizzying array of characters from past books walk in and out of sections and chapters, but couched within this shift (and end of an era, perhaps?) is the story of Zaira and Aden, 2 other prominent Arrow soldiers who have, like shadows, passed through the pages of Nalini Singh’s earlier books.


Tortured and captured, Aden and Zaira find themselves beyond psychic help and in unfamiliar territory. Help comes unexpectedly from an isolated leopard changeling pack and a growing conspiracy intended to rattle the newfound (and uneasy) peace between the humans, changelings and the psys brings both of them–as well as the reader–into deeper contact with the water changelings and other characters who have until now, been on the periphery.

Zaira struck me as a feral changeling more than a stoic Arrow, but that only becomes apparent after the abolition of Silence which had, until then, kept her monstrous rage and her childhood memories at bay and tightly locked. She finds her own steadying pillar of strength in the unshakable Aden, and discovers the urgent need to leash her anger before she destroys him as well. Aden’s big heart for the Arrows and his infinite patience with Zaira however, steer them in a direction that only shows how extraordinary a leader he is.

Zaira and Aden find new allies and new enemies, navigating a post-silence world as uncertainly as many before them have, and it’s within this new dawn that their relationship is allowed to grow. Their coming together isn’t an explosive encounter; instead it’s a gentle transition borne of the years of knowledge that they were always somehow, already together.

The transitory phase and the obvious shift away from the leopard-wolf alliance have become Singh’s new focus, providing the foundation on which the next story-arc, or perhaps better thought of as Season 2 of the psy-changelings, will be built. I’m filled with mixed feelings throughout, because it’s akin to saying goodbye to familiar and beloved characters (especially Hawke, Sienna and the rest of the Laurens).

I can’t say that I’m not curious about BlackSea or the Falcons and loathe as I am to admit it, I’ve not been emotionally invested in the new changeling groups yet or been sufficiently hooked by the next season’s anticipated stories that Singh promises. Consequently, finishing ‘Shards of Hope’ isn’t exactly the satisfying end I’d hoped it could have been.

four-stars