City Under Siege by R.J. Prescott

City Under Siege by R.J. PrescottCity Under Siege by R.J. Prescott
Published by Amazon Digital Services, Amazon Publishing on February 19th 2018
Pages: 412
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London is a city in flames. Tensions are high and a critical situation is about to go from bad to worse. The Prime Minister wants to send a message, and the SAS will be the ones to deliver it.

Emotional detachment is my speciality. I’m ruthless and cut throat, but there is nobody better.

Sarah Tatem is an innocent. Caught up in a world in which she doesn’t belong, and trying desperately to do the right thing. My job is to keep her safe long enough to get what’s needed, and bring an end to this siege of terror.

But something has changed. I’ve learned that the only thing stronger than loyalty is love, and now she’s gone.

My name is Lieutenant Tom Harper, and I’m about to unleash hell.

‘City Under Siege’ does have an exciting premise and to be honest, I was also lured in by the cover that depicted a post-apocalyptic London which I always seem to have an unholy fascination with.

But for someone who loves romantic suspense, this was a hard book to get through, even to the midway mark. I definitely liked the plot, which (plus points given for starting out strongly) unfortunately stuttered in the middle with the action taking a lull. Add to that endless and very long dialogues—some bordering on the ridiculous—taking place in scenes that I feel weren’t especially necessary and ‘City Under Siege’ found one of its victims in me.

Perhaps these scenes were meant to know the growing bond between Tom and Sarah, or perhaps they were meant to inject some levity into a serious situation, but these ended up mostly flat for me, with some secondary characters coming in and being over-the-top ridiculous in their villainy. Consequently, I was bored boneless and struggled to the midway mark while wondering when things were going to start rolling again.

I’m not quite sure if I’m able to put a finger on it specifically, but the combination of poor editing and the constant spelling errors like ‘metal/mettle’, ‘saught/sought’, ‘discrete/discreet’ was off-putting. In addition, I thought the plot and pacing also needed more developmental work for a better flow. ‘City Under Siege’ sadly, didn’t live up to its potential for me, more so because I had high hopes after reading all the glowing reviews about it.


Take a Chance on Me by Jane Porter

Take a Chance on Me by Jane PorterTake a Chance on Me by Jane Porter
Series: Love on Chance Avenue, #3
Published by Tule Publishing on March 18th 2018
Pages: 146
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Savvy stylist Amanda Wright loves Marietta, her hair salon, and her clients, and no client is more dear to her heart than eighty-year-old Bette Justice–even if her years have made her a little fragile. So when Bette asks Amanda to help her convince her determined grandson, Tyler, a successful game designer, that Marietta is the right home for Bette, Amanda can’t say no.

Tyler Justice has a one-track mind–he wants to take care of his beloved grandmother. He can’t understand her resistance to move to Texas and is sure that the young friend she keeps mentioning–Amanda–is taking advantage of his grandmother’s generosity. He reaches Marietta determined to put the salon owner in her place and bring his grandmother home…until smart, kind Amanda starts to tug at his heart in ways he never expected.

But just as Tyler and Amanda start to form a real connection, will a long-buried family secret destroy their chance at love?

I was frankly, bored with this. Bored because I could see the conflict and the eventual resolution coming, unmoved because I couldn’t feel any chemistry between Amanda and Tyler.
Porter posits Marietta as a small but pretty base where happiness is an almost-guarantee (Tule’s publishing numerous Marietta books attest to it), so it was a given that Tyler would in the end, learn to love the place as Amanda and Bette do…there was no other option available here, because apparently Marietta was the answer to problems, so the man—who apparently is the one with the one-track mind—has to do all the compromising, when it became evident that the whole book centred around getting Tyler to see the beauty of the community that was Marietta.
In fact, I didn’t think Tyler was an arse at all, not when his way of wanting to move his grandmother somewhere else had merit which no one else would see. That Amanda pushed her own issues of her past on to Tyler rather unfairly, or that Tyler seemed to be the one always giving in made it hard to read on, especially when Tyler was the only one made to go on the uphill climb to find his own feet when everyone else sang the happy song of Marietta.
‘Take a Chance on Me’ rubbed me the wrong way early in the book and sadly, I never quite got back that sense of traction or the desire to go on.

The Last King by Katee Robert

The Last King by Katee RobertThe Last King by Katee Robert
Series: The Kings, #1
Published by Forever on April 3rd 2018
Pages: 384
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Beckett King just inherited his father's fortune, his company-and all his enemies. If he's going to stay on top, he needs someone he can trust beside him. And though they've been rivals for years, there's no one he trusts more than Samara Mallick.

The rebel. That's how Samara has always thought of Beckett. And he's absolutely living up to his unpredictable ways when he strides into her office and asks for help. She can't help wondering if it's a legit request or just a ploy to get her into bed. Not that she'd mind either one. After all, she likes to live on the edge too.

But soon the threats to the King empire are mounting, and the two find family secrets darker than they ever imagined and dangerous enough to get them both killed.

Filthy rich family drama—tuned up several notches—lies at the heart of ‘The Last King’ as children pay for the bad blood that started decades before their time and work painfully through schisms because of one woman’s longstanding, poisonous resentment left to fester.

It isn’t often that I read such books (the constant bitching and underhanded manoeuvring can get headache-inducing), but Katee Robert’s writing is compelling enough to try. As I suspected, it was easy to get engrossed in the tale of bad blood, bitchy office politics and corporate espionage that sort of runs the boundary into the murderous, though it felt a little like an oncoming train wreck I couldn’t take my eyes off. Vile aunt vs. struggling nephew, the former of whom gets her comeuppance and the latter of whom finally gets what he deserves? How sweet the sound. Built into this first establishing story however, is also a very difficult generation transition with several burn marks to pay for getting rid of a vile villain you’d love to hate, and a rival-to-lovers tale that thankfully, doesn’t involve too many TSTL moments.

Robert does write Beckett King as a protagonist I could sympathise with, and Samara Mallick as a worthy other half for him. Apart from their chemistry scorching the sheets, I didn’t have problems seeing both of them as equals both in and out of bed and I actually liked how Robert wrote Samara’s eventual shift in loyalty towards Beckett instead of blindly following his vile aunt the whole way.

In fact, I expected to be exhausted by the end of ‘The Last King’. Instead, I was drawn in—admittedly a little slowly at first—, surprised at how Beckett and Samara stole the show for me, as did Robert’s secondary characters, making me anxious to get onto the other Kings’ stories, though a long, long wait is in order.


Quake by Tracey Alvarez

Quake by Tracey AlvarezQuake by Tracey Alvarez
on March 9th 2018
Pages: 236
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He’ll shake her foundations…

Ana Grace is living a single mother’s worst nightmare. Separated from her two kids by a catastrophic earthquake, she’s trapped in her office building with a man she’s only just met. He’s a sexy former soldier, and possibly the only man able to help her navigate the dangerous landscape home.

Daniel Calder is tired of failing people he’s tried to help, but since Ana is his younger sister’s boss, he’s caught between a rock and a hard place. That rock keeps shifting under his feet, shaking his determination not to become emotionally involved with another damsel in distress.

But when an unforeseen enemy rises from a city in chaos, Ana Grace and her family are in the crosshairs. There’s so much more at stake than just their hearts, and the clock is ticking.

‘Quake’ resonated with me in more ways than one. Apart from the devastating quakes that have stolen the headlines in New Zealand over the past few years, that Tracey Alvarez has chosen to set her book in Wellington—a place which I adore—and its familiar surrounds made me walk in these footsteps once again. It was all too easy to imagine the windiest city in the world swept away in the tsunami that resulted because of the fictional quake, the landslides and mudflow and the aftershocks crumbling everything that I remember all too well.
‘Quake’ is a departure from Alvarez’s ‘Due South’ and ‘Far North’ series, and I was beyond intrigued (but eager) to see how she’d tackle this book. Here, Alvarez’s distinct rom-com voice is replaced with a more sombre, direct narrative, though it’s no less engaging, well-written and realistic, more so since it’s about an area built on a faultline that has and is likely to see more of these quakes to come. The small bit of suspense does not entirely kick in until later, with the first half being more of a catalogue of how the desperate survive, though the insinuation that there are those who would take advantage of chaos to further their own malicious agendas is a brilliant idea, if a little baffling in this instance. Still, Ana’s and Daniel’s accidental, longer-than-expected involvement is only that is mostly believable, given the adrenaline and tension of a natural disaster forging stronger bonds.
It was admittedly harder to get invested in this pairing than I thought. If Daniel was the hero I thought he was, Ana’s appalling behaviour and emotional cowardice didn’t make me a fan of hers at all. The numerous times she pushed Daniel away and hurt him made me think that a smack was in fact, sorely needed, despite the spurts of courage and bravery that she showed while making her way home to her children. Painting Daniel with the same brush as her father and ex was unfair and she knew it but ultimately, Ana’s repetitive but brutal actions towards him—all the way to the very end—made her a lot less easy to like than Daniel whose loyalty and devotion seemed misplaced and undeserved.
My reservations about Ana however, shouldn’t be a deterrent to those who like disaster-type stories with romance and a hint of suspense thrown in. There is so much that’s unique about ‘Quake’’s premise but my own bias about New Zealand is probably showing here; Alvarez’s assured and confident writing just makes the pot that much sweeter.

Delta: Ricochet by Cristin Harber

Delta: Ricochet by Cristin HarberDelta: Ricochet by Cristin Harber
Series: Delta #4
Published by Mill Creek Press on February 27th 2018
Pages: 419
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Colin questioned his recruitment to Delta team from day one, but he's made sure to earn his accomplishments twice over. No one could accuse his diplomat father of pulling strings.

Falling for Adelia is everything he never planned and always wanted. No complications. No agenda. Just a sweet girl who made him smile.

But Adelia has spun a network of lies around the world to help save women from human traffickers, and she's stolen from Mayhem motorcycle club, the men who saved her life, to do it. Anonymous friends back her unseen good deeds—until a link snaps. Actions have consequences in the Mayhem MC world. The repercussions are deadly.

Everywhere she turns, the fallout ripples. Friends become enemies. Family walks away. There's no one left to save her except for the man she's fallen in love with, and she'd do anything to keep him from Mayhem's ricochet.

‘Delta: Ricochet’ started out well enough, but this is my dislike for MCs-type stories speaking here, which Cristin Harber has integrated more and more into her Delta series with the longstanding topic of human trafficking taking priority in the last few of these books. I definitely prefer Harber’s Titan storylines that are more in the grain of the type of romantic suspense that I like to read, and clearly this preference is what’s partially accounting for my rating.

Undoubtedly, the setup of Colin’s and Adelia’s story is an intriguing one and it works well enough as a standalone since Harber does drop hints of what happened before. The first quarter brings Colin’s and Adelia’s paths together in way that is easy to follow (and is in my opinion, the best bit about the story which I sailed through), though their slow, slow burn does stretch past this mark. ‘Ricochet’ is however, a way longer read than what Harber typically churns out. Topping at 400+ish pages on my reader, however, my doubts crept in after I hit the 30% mark and my reading process faltered badly.

The funny thing about Harber’s characters is that they don’t necessarily behave the way and say the things you expect them to. ‘Ricochet’ isn’t too different, but the result here is one of meandering dialogues, character responses that don’t address questions head-on and a prolonging of the advancement of plot. The less-than-succinct delivery meant that a fair bit of editing—for structure, for the huge number of writing errors that really, really shouldn’t be there at this stage and for the roundabout dialogue—would have streamlined the ‘Ricochet’ into a read that had less stutters and abrupt lulls as action scenes built and simply dwindled away.

Still, the amount of riddles, courtesy of the work of secondary characters (which happily ran interference both for plot and structure) and Adelia’s deliberate and frustrating-as-hell in-but-not-in stance with Colin tanked the whole story for me. If Adelia started out as a protagonist whom I admired, this soon changed after the extraordinary lengths she went to obfuscate what she’d been doing all along in Mayhem when it became clear at a certain point that full disclosure (to the right parties) was needed.

I’m all for strong and independent heroines, don’t get me wrong. But having said this before, I think this merits it being said again: such a character isn’t afraid to ask for help, is brave enough to know when she is out of her depth and doesn’t play games when time is of the essence—all of which I thought Adelia fell alarmingly short of when the situation called for it. Calling for blind trust from Colin when she wouldn’t give hers stank of hypocrisy, not to mention the mind-boggling idiocy she showed when she stubbornly decided to go at things on her own without asking for the support she knew she so badly needed. Acting the martyr (yes, a goodbye note was included) was not only unnecessary at this point, but the stupidity of it threw me off so much that I stopped reading completely as ‘Ricochet’ neared its climax.

From a fantastic start to a muddling finish that soured quickly, ‘Ricochet’ capped off what has been a disappointing series for me, more so because Harber’s earlier books had made me a stalwart fan of hers. Thus far, the later Titan books and the Delta series haven’t run any bells for me to the point where I’m almost wary to pick up another book of hers…for fear of being disappointed once again.


Love and Other Words by Christina Lauren

Love and Other Words by Christina LaurenLove and Other Words by Christina Lauren
Published by Gallery Books on April 10th 2018
Pages: 432
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The story of the heart can never be unwritten.

Macy Sorensen is settling into an ambitious if emotionally tepid routine: work hard as a new pediatrics resident, plan her wedding to an older, financially secure man, keep her head down and heart tucked away.

But when she runs into Elliot Petropoulos—the first and only love of her life—the careful bubble she’s constructed begins to dissolve. Once upon a time, Elliot was Macy’s entire world—growing from her gangly bookish friend into the man who coaxed her heart open again after the loss of her mother...only to break it on the very night he declared his love for her.

Told in alternating timelines between Then and Now, teenage Elliot and Macy grow from friends to much more—spending weekends and lazy summers together in a house outside of San Francisco devouring books, sharing favorite words, and talking through their growing pains and triumphs. As adults, they have become strangers to one another until their chance reunion. Although their memories are obscured by the agony of what happened that night so many years ago, Elliot will come to understand the truth behind Macy’s decade-long silence, and will have to overcome the past and himself to revive her faith in the possibility of an all-consuming love.

One thing I know after reading ‘Love and Other Words’ is that that’s Christina Lauren’s searing, literary-tinged writing is the book’s standout, more so because of a romance built on intellect, the love of words and books. Lauren takes on the second-chance romance with aplomb here and I’m grudgingly admitting that the unusual mix of circumstances and events do make this scenario more plausible than many others that I’ve come across, thereby making Elliot/Macy a pairing that aren’t back together just because they decided to give it a go once again.

Told with interspersed flashbacks but only in Macy’s POV, Elliot’s and Macy’s story is one of teenage love, love lost and then found again many years later, all because a mistake turns into a history of grief and tragedy that neither could have expected. In the present, serendipity—written as fate that would inevitably draw these one-time lovers back together again—forces an awkward reunion in a coffee shop and the moment Elliot and Macy are back in each other’s orbits, their coming back together despite the circumstances is written and seen as inevitability. If the timeline in the past is one of anticipatory dread to the moment where they are torn apart, the present crawls a little, almost moving backwards as it constantly points towards the upcoming revelation of what really happened before closing with a short (and rather abrupt) resolution thereafter.

Structurally, ‘Love and Other Words’ is well-balanced between past and present, as the measured but slow pacing of Elliot’s and Macy’s relationship builds to a point where you cannot—or would not—look away from the train wreck that’s coming. The rocky road back together isn’t necessarily an enjoyable a journey for every reader nonetheless; Macy’s engagement and Elliot’s quick breakup with his girlfriend mean that secondary characters do play a role here, and it could be argued that cheating (sort-of) had been a significant part of the whole mess.

There’s breadth and depth in the storytelling and insights given into the emotional damage they’ve both carried throughout the years, though it is harder to believe however, that they could gravitate towards each other again that easily and quickly after 11 years. I actually wanted to know if there was really any comeuppance for the guilty parties involved which felt glossed over, but Lauren does not get into the tic-for-tac business nonetheless. This is my own cynical and vindictive self speaking clearly, as the focus steadfastly remains on the idea of star-crossed lovers and soul mates who, after having established their belonging to each other in their teens, seem destined to always love and find each other again no matter the distance. Elliot/Macy are, by this time, above the mistakes of their past, though I would have been happier seeing a more concrete resolution that didn’t just span the last 2 or so chapters wrapping up their HEA that prioritised their moving on and moving in together.

‘Love and Other Words’ does however, suggest that there’s only ‘the one’ without whom the other can’t function properly—it’s an idea I’m vaguely uncomfortable with, despite the commonly-held romantic notion perpetuated in fiction that 2 people are simply biding time (with others) before they can get back to each other. Furthermore, Elliot’s assumption that they could have waved the past away with an explanation of his drunken mistake without considering the ramifications of the betrayal felt overly optimistic as well; that it should be forgiven because he hadn’t known he was making the mistake at the time just doesn’t feel justified enough.

But maybe I’m grasping at straws for a pretty entertaining read; the all-is-right-with-the-world ending is what Elliot/Macy’s dreams are supposed to be made of after all, isn’t it?


Disturbing His Peace by Tessa Bailey

Disturbing His Peace by Tessa BaileyDisturbing His Peace by Tessa Bailey
Series: The Academy #3
Published by Avon on April 24th 2018
Pages: 384
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She’s got probable cause to make her move . . .

Danika Silva can’t stand Lt. Greer Burns. Her roommate’s older brother may be sexy as hell, but he’s also a cold, unfeeling robot. She just wants to graduate and forget about her scowling superior. But when a dangerous mistake lands Danika on probation—under Greer’s watch—she’s forced to interact with the big, hulking jerk. Call him daily to check in? Done. Ride shotgun in his cruiser every night? Done. Try not to climb into his giant, muscular lap and kiss him? Umm…

Greer doesn’t let anythingor anyone—distract him from the job. Except lately, all he can think about is Danika. He’s wanted the beautiful, cocky recruit since the moment he saw her. But she’s reckless and unpredictable, and Greer is painfully aware of what can happen when an officer doesn’t follow the rules. Probation seemed like a good idea, but now Danika’s scent is in his car and he’s replayed her voicemails twenty times. Christ, he’s a goner.

Danika’s melting Greer’s stone-cold exterior one ride-along at a time. Being together could have serious consequences… but breaking a few rules never hurt anybody, right?

In the first 2 books, Tessa Bailey teased us with this simmering tension between Greer and Danika, so the final installment of The Academy series is one that I’d been impatiently waiting for. And as I’d expected of Bailey, Greer/Danika’s story is volatile but scorching, with the requisite bouts of self-doubt and angst, as Greer (the hardass) Burns finally meets his match when recruit Danika Silva gets under his skin.

Like all of Bailey’s males, Greer magically turned into alpha-aggressive, dirty-talking man in bed, though this much I’ve already come to expect of him. But while it was fun to read about the prim and buttoned-up Lieutenant lose his cool, I actually preferred and liked the tortured soul that Bailey showed here, as much as I liked the cold exterior that he displayed to the world because his layers went that much deeper.

In contrast, I’d been unable to get a grasp on Danika’s character from the past 2 books, but I’d been hesitant to see Greer/Danika as a pairing when the latter had come across as cocky, impetuous and rebellious without a cause simply because her buttons were pushed by a stone-cold Lieutenant. Yet the Danika here seemed so more likeable and understandable as Bailey un-peels the layers from her: she is the responsible caretaker, the reliable and dependable one who takes people’s burdens because she can, until it becomes both a crutch and a source of pride. In this way, Danika was who Greer needed, though it did, predictably, come to a point when Danika tried to take too much on her shoulders and ended up in danger because of it.

So to this extent, ‘Disturbing his Peace’ doesn’t disappoint.

But Bailey’s stories do follow a pattern: the meet/greet, the hot and steamy, the emotional sharing, the conflict (and temporary breakup) and the grovelling/HEA. To say that I dreaded the conflict is an understatement, because it was sniffable a mile away.

The issues I had, apart from the implausibility that a department would grant an instructor/recruit leeway for being together, was that the blame for their conflict late in the story seemed to be laid solely on Greer’s feet as though Danika had nothing to make amends for when she actually needed to own the mistake she made. There were clearly lessons to learn on both sides—and issues to be sorted out—and despite this, I felt that Danika hadn’t put enough of herself out there at the end, despite all the lip-service she’d paid to the sentiment earlier on in the book. I thought she was too quick to write Greer off, too impatient in expecting a lot out of a man who’d closed himself up for years, and too hard-headed to be understanding at the point where Greer had needed her most.

That said though, ‘Disturbing his Peace’ is an easy read, never straying into the heavy angst under Bailey’s excellent handling of her characters’ emotional states. For that reason alone, I keep coming back—though it’s harder in this particular case, to say goodbye to this series that had drawn me in from the start.