Category: New Adult

Overture by Skye Warren

Overture by Skye WarrenOverture by Skye Warren
Published by Skye Warren on 19th February 2019
Pages: 176
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Forbidden fruit never tasted this sweet…

The world knows Samantha Brooks as the violin prodigy. She guards her secret truth—the desire she harbors for her guardian.

Liam North got custody of her six years ago. She’s all grown up now, but he still treats her like a child. No matter how much he wants her.

No matter how bad he aches for one taste.

Her sweet overtures break down the ex-soldier’s defenses, but there’s more at stake than her body. Every touch, every kiss, every night. The closer she gets, the more exposed his darkest secret.

She’s one step away from finding out what happened the night she lost her family. One step away from leaving him forever.

Skye Warren’s daring forbidden themes have been my catnip for a while and I jumped on ‘Overture’ for this very reason. A warning caveat about the edginess of this story: Warren respects the consensual age limit, though the age-gap between guardian and ward along with the barely-legal, forbidden but very erotic vibe here however, would be a no-go for some.

Security-firm owner Liam North’s and music-prodigy Samantha Brooks’s slowly changing relationship is where ‘Overture’ begins—during a transition point that has established norms getting flipped on their ends, leaving both Liam and Samantha at a loss when it comes to behaving around each other.

Liam is understandably conflicted and resistant (perhaps rightly so, considering his position) about desiring and seeing Samantha other than a ward to protect, though his lack of staying power, his blowing hot and cold to the very end got incredibly frustrating. Yet their smouldering connection, built up slowly through a careful interplay of push and pull and several stunning, near-erotic encounters, was one that I found myself enthralled by and left wanting more than just the accidental, hurried sexual encounter at the end–Warren’s nuanced writing carries it all.

There’s an inkling early on however, that ‘Overture’ isn’t simply a forbidden romance where 2 people try to bridge the age-gap. What threw me off was the somewhat divergent plotline of Liam’s security business, the insertion of his brothers and their activities and the mysterious history surrounding Samantha’s early childhood years that intruded in separation that came at the end. So clearly, the under-developed plot and the unhappy, unfinished ending were the story’s biggest downer, even with the promise of more to come.

I do like Warren’s prose however, and the use of music and the multiple metaphors that you can draw from it as the bridging device drew me in from the start. Being left unsatisfied with the lack of a veritable HEA is how I finished this read nonetheless, though I’m counting on the sequel to rectify this.

The Risk by Elle Kennedy

The Risk by Elle KennedyThe Risk by Elle Kennedy
Series: Briar U #2
Published by Elle Kennedy Inc. on 18th February 2019
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three-stars

Everyone says I’m a bad girl. They’re only partly right—I don’t let fear rule me, and I certainly don’t care what people think. But I draw the line at sleeping with the enemy. As the daughter of Briar’s head hockey coach, I’d be vilified if I hooked up with a player from a rival team.

And that’s who Jake Connelly is. Harvard’s star forward is arrogant, annoying, and too attractive for his own good. But fate is cruel—I require his help to secure a much-coveted internship, and the sexy jerk isn’t making it easy for me.
I need Connelly to be my fake boyfriend.

For every fake date…he wants a real one.

Which means this bad girl is in big trouble. Nothing good can come from sneaking around with Jake Connelly. My father would kill me, my friends will revolt, and my post-college career is on the line. But while it’s getting harder and harder to resist Jake’s oozing sex appeal and cocky grin, I refuse to fall for him.

That’s the one risk I’m not willing to take.

Enter the raunchy world of college hookups, the infamous laddish, cocky behaviours of manwhore athletes, competitive sports (typically hockey) and the bumpy transition from hormonal young adulthood to equally hormonal adulthood. At least, this is how I’ve seen Elle Kennedy’s college campus series shaping out to be thus far—I’ve not been wrong here—and ‘The Risk’ continues in this similar fashion as Kennedy milks the shallows of college life, only with a fraternising with the enemy vibe from the beginning.

Brenna Jensen and Jake Connelly play for opposing teams though the friction that comes when they cross paths is perhaps better summed up as ‘love and hate being 2 sides of the same coin’. There are too many reasons why the mutual attraction shouldn’t be given into, and god forbid that Jake should have any say at all in who Brenna chooses to hook up with. It’s a predictable journey thereafter; emotions develop after they get down and dirty, and along with their futures getting put on the line as well.

It always takes a bit of a mental adjustment for me to get into Elle Kennedy’s construction of her New-Adult world anyhow: there’re often bursts of selfish, juvenile behaviour and several moments of ’the world is bigger than me’ revelation, which also have my sympathies for the characters going up and down like a yo-yo. My reservations, perhaps have also got to do with the feeling that I’m reading about protagonists who simply don’t show enough depth despite the angsty teenage struggles they face…and that they’ve still not done enough of growing up by the end of the book.

And for that reason I can’t quite connect or root for them. Brenna/Jake weren’t exactly likeable protagonists at all—I did think they were selfish and immature in their own ways, even though their tussles were amusing at the very least. What was somewhat frustrating was the hint of unrequited love at the end—a pining best friend doesn’t get the man she’s always wanted, while said man goes for someone who couldn’t quite be compassionate about the hurt that this caused—and that the HEAs in the series are stubbornly about people who don’t always seem the best matched couple.

Given the glowing reviews about Kennedy’s Off-Campus series and the Briar U series, I’m well aware that I’m standing off to one side being sceptical of what pairing Kennedy will churn out next. There’s no doubt that she does tell an engaging story. I just wish I could have liked it more.

three-stars

Keep Her Safe by K.A. Tucker

Keep Her Safe by K.A. TuckerKeep Her Safe by K.A. Tucker
Published by Atria Books on 23rd January 2018
Pages: 436
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three-half-stars

Noah Marshall has known a privileged and comfortable life thanks to his mother, the highly decorated chief of the Austin Police Department. But all that changes the night she reveals a skeleton that's been rattling in her closet for years, and succumbs to the guilt of destroying an innocent family's life. Reeling with grief, Noah is forced to carry the burden of this shocking secret.

Gracie Richards wasn't born in a trailer park, but after fourteen years of learning how to survive in The Hollow, it's all she knows anymore. At least here people don't care that her dad was a corrupt Austin cop, murdered in a drug deal gone wrong. Here, she and her mother are just another family struggling to survive...until a man who clearly doesn't belong shows up on her doorstep.

Despite their differences, Noah and Gracie are searching for answers to the same questions, and together, they set out to uncover the truth about the Austin Police Department's dark and messy past. But the scandal that emerges is bigger than they bargained for, and goes far higher up than they ever imagined.

With an apparent suicide that sparks off a civilian-run investigation, K.A Tucker plunges us straight into a fascinating case of deep rot in a police department, the layers of cover-ups and complicity at all levels. That much, ‘Keep Her Safe’ is a solid thriller/suspense as Noah Marshall and Grace Richards try to untangle threads that many have tried to sever in a 14-year-old mystery. Tucker pours out theories, doubts upon doubts, throws in several signposts and red-herrings while piling on the emotion—all of which did keep me engaged until the end. Well, mostly.

At 400 pages, ‘Keep Her Safe’ ran the risk of being bloated, along with the slow burn of a romance that thankfully, didn’t exactly detract from the plot. Told in several POVs, straddling different timelines, this was drawn out much more than I thought it would, as it soon became clear (halfway into it at least) who the major, dirty players were.

That much I liked, as cynical as the plot is, about a broken justice system where evasion and conspiracy (and deliberately not doing the right thing) seem the reigning themes of this procedural.

Character-wise however…oh lord, how I loathed Grace—a hormonal teenager masquerading as an adult.

Petulant and petty, with an uncontrollable temper, with a bull-headed tendency to rush into everything—and blaming everyone else for everything not going right—Grace’s large chip on her shoulder was so blindingly big that it was impossible to like her at all. It always felt that she was the self-righteous one, while Noah always fumbled in his missteps and had the uphill climb to appease her ‘world-owes-me-big’ attitude. I get it—she’s had a hard life. But behaving at every turn like the world owes her everything for that while trampling everyone and anyone because of her circumstances? Didn’t get too much sympathy from me here.

Noah’s restraint in contrast, was a cool balm of relief, though I got annoyed and tired with the number of times he had to keep her flaring temper and her inability to even sit and think rationally. That he had to keep placating her made him like a caretaker of an unruly child instead of a romantic interest.

That said, K.A Tucker isn’t quite an author on my regular feed, though I’m guessing she should be. While I couldn’t (or rather, didn’t) buy into the romance at all, ‘Keep Her Safe’ is more than a decent read even though I took days to finish it.

three-half-stars

Remedy by Kaylee Ryan

Remedy by Kaylee RyanRemedy by Kaylee Ryan
Published by Amazon Digital Services, Amazon Publishing on 15th January 2019
Pages: 310
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three-half-stars

It took one night with her to know she was my forever.It took one minute for me to climb out of bed and drive away from her.It’s taken me three years to confess that leaving her behind was the biggest mistake of my life.

I won’t stop until she knows what she means to me. I’ll convince her to listen to her heart.

It took one night for all of my dreams to come true.It took one morning, waking up alone, for those same dreams to come crashing down around me.It’s taken me three years to confess that night changed me forever.

He says this time is different, but how do I open my heart up to a man who’s already ripped it to shreds?

‘Remedy’ is an exercise in grovelling, at least for the first half of the book. The backstory is as the blurb suggest: a spurned (and now understandably gun-shy) heroine and a hero left with profound regrets and is now back to right the wrongs he’d done. Kudos to him though—Kaylee Ryan doesn’t have Grady Carmichael faltering in any sense of the word and his relentless pursuit of his best friend’s sister whom he’d left three years ago. The result is unanimous: he gets the girl, even though her resistance, as expected, proves a little bit of an obstacle at first.

What happened in their past is told in a half-hearted fashion however, and the flashbacks took place in a way that didn’t make too much of an impact on me, or at least enough to convince me that the ‘lost night’ of three years ago was a monumental as both made it seem.

Still, Kaylee Ryan does address the questions I normally have with second-chance romances (namely, why did it take him all this time? Why only now?) though I thought Grady’s explanations not as rock-solid as I would have liked. The saving grace? It’s at least remedied in his unwavering affection for Collins.

In short, if you’re in for a low-angst and a sort of uplifting, loyal-to-each-other kind of pairing, ‘Remedy’ is the kind of read to go for. I had an easy time with this story nonetheless and predictable as it might have been, it was quite a joy to breeze through it – a rare occurrence these days.

three-half-stars

Luna and the Lie by Mariana Zapata

Luna and the Lie by Mariana ZapataLuna and the Lie by Mariana Zapata
on 12th December 2018
Pages: 410
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three-stars

The problem with secrets is that they’re too easy to keep collecting.

Luna Allen has done some things she would rather no one ever know about. She also knows that, if she could go back in time, she wouldn’t change a single thing.
With three sisters she loves, a job she (mostly) adores, and a family built up of friends she’s made over the years, Luna figures everything has worked out the way it was supposed to.

But when one of those secrets involves the man who signs her paycheck, she can’t find it in her to regret it. Despite the fact that he’s not the friendliest man in the world. Or the most patient.

Sometimes there are things you’re better off keeping to yourself.

Getting into a Mariana Zapata book can be daunting. The slow burn—and inevitable length that comes with it—can be both the strength and weakness of the story: this is a balm to sooth the souls of haters of instant love/lust, but also a source of frustration for readers who don’t need every single detail of the protagonists’s quotidian catalogued and repeated page after page.

‘Luna and the Lie’ is classic Zapata (but when has this been any different?): a typically part-overworked, part-naive, down-to-earth (sometimes with the world on her shoulders) and generally likeable heroine who tries hard to adhere to an optimistic-till-death lifelong motto, even when taken down brutally by circumstances and dickish heroes.

Luna Allen fits this mould. It’s easy to form a kind of reader rapport with her, but that is the consistent first-person POV that skews our sympathies to lie with her. On the other hand, there’s the pitfall of having Luna exposed as a ray of sunshine to the point of being spineless and Ripley so obscured that he mostly appears at the periphery as an unevolved neanderthal who doesn’t know how to use the power of speech — instead, using obscure mundane things like giving rides as a symbol of his growing affection, until it really matters most at the end when he miraculously becomes a fountain of words.

For the longest time, I wasn’t sure where the story was going, even though it was clear that there were some revelations that needed revealing and even by the end, I wasn’t entirely satisfied with Lucas Ripley’s history that was simply sketchily drawn up. Point is, it did start to feel as though Zapata was adding length for the sake of doing so in order to draw out the slow burn, and not because her mundane scenes added much significant value to the plot.

The whole reading experience was a bumpy one, as a result. I constantly wavered between skimming, wanting to not finish, and then getting engrossed in an upcoming particular scene…rinse and repeat, so the rating I’m leaving isn’t quite one that I think can accurately reflect how I really felt about this.

Does the slow burn work? Maybe. Do Luna and Rip work as a pair? I’m still not sure, which is probably the main point of it all.

three-stars

Buried by Brenda Rothert

Buried by Brenda RothertBuried by Brenda Rothert
Published by Amazon Digital Services, Amazon Publishing on 15th November 2018
Pages: 167
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two-stars

Do you believe in fate?

I didn’t. I’d worked since childhood to become an NFL starting quarterback. All the blood, sweat, and tears were about to pay off with my name in the record books. Setting an NFL record was going to be the crowning achievement of my career. Hell, of my life.But then fate, the cagey bitch, threw me a curveball I never saw coming. I ended up trapped in a doomsday bunker with four strangers, my chances at that record slipping away as days turned into months.

I never would’ve given Erin a second look. She was gorgeous, sure, but not my type. I liked women who were strong. Fearless. Resilient. Not to mention that she hated me.

But I was so wrong about her. And in that bunker, I fell in crazy, stupid love. I thought a record would be my greatest triumph. But now, all I want is a shot with Erin. I’ve faced down massive linebackers intent on ending me. For her, I’ll go toe-to-toe with fate.

I’ll say from the outset that ‘Buried’ rubbed me the wrong way. I wasn’t too sure what to expect, but putting people in a forced underground bunker albeit by accident wasn’t the scenario I’d envisioned at all. Being stuck in close quarters or rather, cabin fever does make people do things they normally wouldn’t—including hooking up with other people who don’t normally cross their radar.

The life-changing event took place long enough to get everyone’s priorities rearranged while showing up the good, bad and the ugly. But that this was the basis of Erin’s and Derek’s relationship bothered me more than it should, because I wasn’t convinced that he would have spared her a second glance otherwise, nor chosen a woman like her to fit that smarmy playboy athlete lifestyle. How often has the excuse of sports taking up so much time that it becomes a valid reason to become a player on and off the field?

That he also had the urge not to ‘fuck’ her as he did with other women (as usual, she made him want more when he never wanted before, though I’d question if this was just prolonged cabin fever talking)…was a comparison that proved the last straw and an absolute put-off.

It was far easier to like Erin’s more even keel and compassion, and her matter-of-fact view of the player lifestyle not meshing with hers, and how she didn’t turn hysterical when it was clear that their time together was up.

The twist at the end felt more like something done for shock value (things just didn’t really add up satisfactorily as well), after which we were skipped straight to the epilogue. It didn’t seem to do much more other than add an unfinished touch to the entire story, instead worsening what already was a middling read for me.

two-stars

The Tycoon by Molly O’Keefe

The Tycoon by Molly O’KeefeThe Tycoon by Molly O'Keefe
Series: King Family #1
Published by Amazon Digital Services, Amazon Publishing on 12th July 2018
Pages: 246
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two-stars

The cruel and beautiful man who ruined my life has everything he wants—everything except me.

Five years ago, Clayton Rorick loved me. Or so I thought. Turned out he only wanted to get his hands on my daddy’s company. Heartbroken, I ran away with nothing but the clothes on my back. Like a twisted Cinderella. When my father dies, leaving my sisters in a desperate situation, it’s up to me to help them.

I’ll have to beg the man who broke my heart to save us.

But Clayton hasn’t forgotten me and what he wants in exchange for his help is…my body, my heart and my soul.

‘The Tycoon’ took me an extraordinarily long time to finish, despite the novella-length of the whole story. Admittedly, I was distracted with everything else that left reading the last priority on my list.

But still, I got through it, albeit on first or second gear throughout, and at a snail’s pace and there just wasn’t enough rev for me to keep my eyes glued to it. The long story short is: woman finds out that she’s been played by her father and fiancé all along; 5 years later, they’re reunited unwittingly and in a twist of events, she gets manoeuvred into a marriage to help save her sisters who are all in some trouble of their own.

Molly O’Keefe tackles a tricky second-chance romance trope; I think most readers, after reading the injustice done to Veronica would expect some sort of grovelling or some grand gestures that would place Clayton on a playing field where he could ‘earn’ back Veronica’s affections. What we got however, were Veronica’s own musings and doubts about Clayton’s supposed change and how much he was willing to compromise for her this time, though her wariness didn’t always seem backed up by his actions.

But an imbalance in the POVs here meant that we mostly had Veronica’s side of the story—her struggles, her feelings, her emotions—while Clayton’s few scenes in his POV simply made him as remote, aloof and cold-hearted as ever. Acknowledging his mistake with Veronica 5 years ago and apologising in so few lines, then expecting Veronica to cave to his manipulative marriage demands made him seem an unsympathetic, unremorseful character, especially since he’d admitted to using sex as a way to get her defences down.

Seriously?!

It levelled out eventually: less lies, more truth, less obscuring, more sharing and the easing into forgiveness, though by that time, I was bored and skimming. ‘The Tycoon’ would have been a better read for me if there’d been more peaks and valleys—more spikes of the emotional fallout, I guess, but since that didn’t happen, it ended up more exasperating than exciting.

two-stars