The Chase by Elle Kennedy

The Chase by Elle KennedyThe Chase by Elle Kennedy
Series: Briar U, #1
Published by Elle Kennedy Inc. on 6th August 2018
Pages: 377
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three-stars

Everyone says opposites attract. And they must be right, because there’s no logical reason why I’m so drawn to Colin Fitzgerald. I don’t usually go for tattoo-covered, video-gaming, hockey-playing nerd-jocks who think I’m flighty and superficial. His narrow view of me is the first strike against him. It doesn’t help that he’s buddy-buddy with my brother.

And that his best friend has a crush on me.

And that I just moved in with them.

Oh, did I not mention we’re roommates?

I suppose it doesn’t matter. Fitzy has made it clear he’s not interested in me, even though the sparks between us are liable to burn our house down. I’m not the kind of girl who chases after a man, though, and I’m not about to start. I’ve got my hands full dealing with a new school, a sleazy professor, and an uncertain future. So if my sexy brooding roomie wises up and realizes what he’s missing?

He knows where to find me.

Elle Kennedy’s is always a curious choice of an author for me. Very often, her books can go either very well or sideways—yet this is pitted against the readablity of her writing—so it’s this unpredictability that always makes me nervous to start any book of hers.

The blurb of ’The Chase’ sold me really, since it began on the assumption that most surface-level things tended to hide something deeper. But the type of college-life Kennedy portrays—the world of college athletes, sororities, the drug/party-scene and the casual hook-up culture—is one that I’m quite tired of (given the large number of books perpetuating this same worldview, where everyone seems obsessed with only cock-and-boob size and not much else), so picking up this book was done with more than a tad bit of apprehension.

I can’t really remember Summer’s and Fitzy’s flirtation at all but the setup is quite an intriguing one, with opposites-attracting being the main trope…with the moral of the story typically ending with looking past the very shiny veneer.

And I tried very hard to find the deeper bit, though honestly, I can’t say I was entirely successful in plumbing the depths of the protagonists or the superficial world that seemed to be perpetuated here. Even with her learning disability, Summer still did come off as an exhausting, spoilt, over-the-top airhead, full of the drama she tended to create around herself, and trying with words to convince others she has substance rang a little hollow with actions that felt contradictory.

While I liked reading a lot more about were both Summer’s and Fitzy’s interests and plans past their college years rather than the constant focus on hooking-up—even though that seems to be the main theme of N/A books these days? Yet there wasn’t too much of it at all; in fact, the bits about sexual harassment, disabilities and all the other shady little things that tend to get shoved under the carpet were the things that I found too little of as though these were just side issues mentioned, and rushed through because Kennedy focused on who was trying to jump into bed with whom.

Not tackling the hard topics left me disappointed as a result, and the creation of a sort-of love-triangle stuttered what could have been a more convincing effort to build on Summer’s and Fitzy’s connection instead of the mixed messages that kept pinging across (while bulldozing over other people). That the actual romance began much, much later in the book just made the first half feel like filler, or rather, time spent to set-up the rest of the characters and potential pairings in the rest of the series.

So I’m mixed really. Reading ‘The Chase’ wasn’t a hardship at all. The pages flew, the drama (never-ending at times) went on. But I finished it all still wishing, nonetheless, that I had something more solid to take away.

three-stars

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