Starry Eyes by Jenn Bennett

Starry Eyes by Jenn BennettStarry Eyes by Jenn Bennett
Published by Simon Pulse on April 3rd 2018
Pages: 432
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four-stars

Ever since last year’s homecoming dance, best friends-turned-best enemies Zorie and Lennon have made an art of avoiding each other. It doesn’t hurt that their families are the modern day, Californian version of the Montagues and Capulets.

But when a group camping trip goes south, Zorie and Lennon find themselves stranded in the wilderness. Alone. Together.

What could go wrong?

With no one but each other for company, Zorie and Lennon have no choice but to hash out their issues via witty jabs and insults as they try to make their way to safety. But fighting each other while also fighting off the forces of nature makes getting out of the woods in one piece less and less likely.

And as the two travel deeper into Northern California’s rugged backcountry, secrets and hidden feelings surface. But can Zorie and Lennon’s rekindled connection survive out in the real world? Or was it just a result of the fresh forest air and the magic of the twinkling stars?

Sometimes it takes a lot more cajoling to get me on the side of NA/YA fiction and I’ll readily admit that much of it has to do with my increasing difficulty in connecting with characters that I probably would have vociferously sympathised with when I was younger but now itch to smack. Needless to say, ‘Starry Eyes’ started out rocky, unbearable almost because of the eye-rolling teenage angst and drama (the type that makes you want to pick up alcohol even if you don’t drink) and I seriously questioned if this was going to be a book that I was going to finish.

But once the teen shenanigans ended, it seemed as though ‘Starry Eyes’ took off, compelling enough in the whole backcountry adventure (aided loads by a cool, knowledgeable protagonist) and the dangers that awaited both Zorie and Lennon that I couldn’t put it down. There’s still the whole vibe of unresolved teenage angst via the stupidity of miscommunication, or rather, the lack thereof, but it’s entwined now with the mistakes of adults and the learning journey—the sort that you apparently take into adulthood—that’s inevitably always built into YA/NA books.

Thankfully though, there’s no heavy moralistic message that raises the hairs on the back of my neck and I could easily sail through the last and rather exciting half of the book as the pieces laid out early in it start to fall horribly into place in a climax and resolution that left me satisfied.

‘Starry Eyes’ isn’t quite what I expected—I’m quite happy to say this now—but it’s a read that I can’t forget, many hours later after finishing it despite the awful start I had.

four-stars

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