The Hook-Up Experiment by Emma Hart

The Hook-Up Experiment by Emma HartThe Hook-Up Experiment by Emma Hart
Series: The Experiment, #1
Published by Emma Hart on March 13th 2018
Pages: 179
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
three-stars

1.Hate-screw my high school nemesis.2.Remember to hate him.3.Prove my brother wrong.It should be easy.It isn’t.

As the owner of Pick-A-D*ck, New Orleans’ premier hook-up website, my job is simple. Connect two people for a no-strings, no-expectations hook-up. The plus for my clients is that I’m the one who gets to sift through the d*ck pics—except this time, they're required.

My problem? My brother, co-owner of Pick-A-D*ck’s sister dating site, doesn’t believe it’s possible to hook up with someone three times and not fall in love. I disagree. I know it’s possible.

And my disagreement is exactly how I end up reconnected with my high school nemesis, Elliott Sloane. The guy who asked me to junior prom and then stood me up. Who egged my car when I rejected him, and convinced my senior homecoming date to ghost me.

It should be easy to hate-screw him. If only he was still that person, instead of a hot-as-hell single dad, working as a builder to make ends’ meet, fighting for custody of his daughter.

Three hook-ups.One outcome.Right?

Having a job that involves looking at dick pics isn’t one I’d personally pick for myself, though that alone is off-kilter enough to keep me reading in what is a really…loud, messy and mostly angst-free story. ‘The Hook-Up Experiment’ is as the title describes: a bet made to see if love can can still be taken out of the equation in a 2-week hookup.

This is upbeat, rom-com land (a style that works well for Emma Hart) and a read so easy to breeze through in a few hours. Hart’s relationship building is clearly the book’s strongest point, and the strong links we have between Peyton, her friends and Elliott form the backbone of the story, which, incidentally also provides the launching pad for the next book in this duet.

But while I did like Hart’s snappy, smart-alecky style, I think the issue for me here could probably be summed up in 2 words: ten years. A bloody decade that is actually, a long time. Especially in the years 18-28. Life happens—people marry, get divorced, have children, earn great highs and go through new lows and in the process, get worn down a little, see some things differently, and generally, change as they age.

That Peyton hadn’t gotten past something that happened when she and Elliott were teens seemed increasingly ridiculous as time wore on, so the weak premise of the plot made me frown at first. I couldn’t get past how Peyton hadn’t let go of the immature grudge—surely there were other things more important in life that came in the course of the next decade to stew on than a missing prom date?—where I’d expected distance, time and maturity to have made some sort of change. Consequently, for much of the story, I wondered if Hart would ever be able to close the supposed ‘age-gap’ between Peyton’s neurotic adulting and Elliott’s maturity when there was actually none.

Still, it was a story I mostly enjoyed—the quirks of Hart’s very strong secondary characters (bound to have their own book soon) were the highlight for me though they skirted the boundaries of being juvenile—and even if ‘The Hook-Up Experiment’ felt at times like ‘Friends’ on steroids, I’m saying right now, to put me down for the next one.

three-stars

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *