Brooklynaire by Sarina Bowen

Brooklynaire by Sarina BowenBrooklynaire by Sarina Bowen
Series: Brooklyn Bruisers #4
Published by Rennie Road Books on February 12th 2018
Pages: 452
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three-half-stars

You'd think a billion dollars, a professional hockey team and a six-bedroom mansion on the Promenade would satisfy a guy. You'd be wrong.

For seven years Rebecca has brightened my office with her wit and her smile. She manages both my hockey team and my sanity. I don't know when I started waking in the night, craving her. All I know is that one whiff of her perfume ruins my concentration. And her laugh makes me hard.

When Rebecca gets hurt, I step in to help. It's what friends do. But what friends don't do is rip off each others' clothes for a single, wild night together.

Now she's avoiding me. She says we're too different, and it can never happen again. So why can't we keep our hands off each other?

Writing this review was difficult, mostly because of the anticipation I had with Nate/Becca’s story—the build-up and the fandom surrounding this couple pretty much came to a feeding frenzy—which Sarina Bowen finally wrote. Most likely then, were my expectations over the top and too fanciful and honestly, probably something no author would want to write, which also meant that my own personal expectations had to be adjusted after I blew through the book.

‘Brooklynaire’ is in essence, a forbidden-ish boss/employee story, with the billionaire hero thrown into it, yet it’s also a very slow, meandering friends-to-lovers romance, after several wrong turns that involved a fair bit of bed-hopping and a pregnancy scare before the delirious HEA happens. Part of it is also a Nate and Becca origins story; the brief details given in their early years were what I loved the most as both protagonists started on their friendship, before the money and glitz came rolling in, back when the guys were just really smart geeks in jeans and hoodies working as a tech startup. Half of the first book took place in the same timeline as the previous book however, filling in the gaps of what we thought might have happened in ‘Pipe Dream’ and it was only in the second half that Bowen brings us onto uncharted ground with their relationship.

I wasn’t too sure what I was exactly expecting, but I did find myself hoping that Nate/Becca’s story had taken a different turn somehow: the amount of OW-drama proved a little too much for my liking, even though the focus remained Nate’s uphill climb to get Becca to see him as the man beneath the suit in a way that didn’t fully push up the dial on the angst. It was frankly, harder to get behind them especially when Nate’s past hammered back in just when their relationship was on the uptick—I thought we could have done without the last, frustrating bit that threw me for a loop.

Still, Bowen has a writing style that sucks you in and never lets go, and her heartfelt characters have quirks (which you like) and a sense of maturity (mostly) that make them generally likeable and more easily relatable than others that I’ve read about. Consequently, finishing any book of Sarina Bowen is no hardship—to this extent I’m in awe of Bowen’s ability to get a reader’s empathy for either one or even both of her protagonists. It’s definitely odd that I thought I would have liked ‘Brooklynaire’ better, though as happy as I am to see Nate/Becca finally getting the ending they should be getting, their story didn’t punch me as emotionally hard as I thought it would have.

three-half-stars

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