Deep Burn by Kimberly Kincaid

Posted in Advanced Reader Copy/ Contemporary Romance/ Mystery/Crime/ Reviews/ Romantic Suspense 30th May 2017
Deep Burn by Kimberly KincaidDeep Burn by Kimberly Kincaid
Series: Station Seventeen #2
on June 5th 2017
Pages: 269
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three-stars

Firefighter Shae McCullough is all-in, all the time. When her reckless response at a fire earns her a two-week penance filing paperwork for the arson investigation unit, the rules and routines are enough to bore her senseless. But the discovery of a possible arson at a murder scene has her instincts fired up, and when Shae is assigned to assist Remington’s elite intelligence unit with their investigation, she’s all too ready to jump in with both boots first.
To tech and surveillance expert James Capelli, logic isn’t just a job requirement, it’s a way of life. He’s less than thrilled to work with Shae, whose impulsiveness threatens his sanity and whose curves threaten his composure. Despite their differences, they uncover a case bigger than anyone could have expected—along with an attraction that burns deep.
But this killer is no stranger, and Capelli’s got a dark past. Can he and Shae outsmart a ruthless murderer, or will his secrets bury them both?

I’ve been waiting a long while for Kimberly Kincaid’s Station Seventeen series to come back and I’m happy to see ‘Deep Burn’ mark its return. A case of arson and murder kicks it all off and Kincaid pits total opposites—a reckless, impulsive firefighter and a rational, tech guy with a guarded past—in this one when it seems as though the previous case and this are linked by a shadowy criminal figure intent on pulling everyone’s strings.

I’ll admit from the start that it took me a long time to warm up to Shae McCullough, if I could even at all. Reckless, impulsive—with a load of adjectives in between—and always straining at the leash to do something, there was a part of me that wondered if that rogue bit of her was going to endanger someone at the end, if it hadn’t already had at the start. But her open honesty and her loyalty to Capelli did help make up for it, particularly after he told her about his criminal past.

I do appreciate Kincaid’s unusual take on James Capelli though; there’s this borderline, repressed almost-manic air to him if that energy isn’t channelled into logical, rational crime-solving, which would probably lead him straight back into his criminal hacking past that he’s desperate to bury. The brooding, careful calculation with which he does things is admittedly more attractive than the impulse that Shae shows, though this is probably my own OCD showing up, and I really liked how tech and surveillance guys can be heroes in their own right as Kincaid has shown.

From the onset, it seemed as though this unlikely pairing wouldn’t be able to cut it together—that great is the social and metaphorical distance between them, but as the arson/murder investigation goes on, Shae and Capelli do balance each other out in a way I didn’t quite expect. I’d hoped though, to see more of a moderating influence that Capelli might have had on Shae, just as she could have had him becoming more spontaneous and less buttoned-down, which didn’t exactly happen.

Despite this, Kincaid’s writing is as solid as ever (it’s a style that appeals personally to me) and as always, I can’t wait to see what else she has up her sleeve with Station Seventeen.

three-stars

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