Saying I Do by Tracey Alvarez

Posted in Advanced Reader Copy/ Chick Lit/ Contemporary Romance/ Reviews 7th May 2017
Saying I Do by Tracey AlvarezSaying I Do by Tracey Alvarez
Series: Due South #8
Published by Tracey Alvarez on May 19th 2017
Pages: 235
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four-stars

Marriage and happily-ever-after are for suckers…
Joe Whelan was fooled once on the way to the altar, and the Irish doctor isn’t about to be an eejit over a woman again. Especially not one who witnessed his broken-hearted humiliation years ago. He won’t be swayed by the sparks that fly whenever his eyes meet MacKenna’s or distracted by her sweet kisses. The only thing Joe cares about is preventing his sister from making the biggest marital mistake of her life.
MacKenna Jones loves a good wedding—so long as she’s sewing the bride’s gown, not walking down the aisle herself. Falling for Joe Whelan’s sexy bedside manner wasn’t on the cards, neither was a seven-day road trip with him to Las Vegas, the Marriage Capital of the World. When the stakes are so high, will these two gun-shy cynics ever say I Do?

I’ve always been fond of the Due South cast (some couples more than others, admittedly) and every new book in this series is like revisiting the motley crew who live in Stewart Island, so far from the rest of the world yet so happy in their windswept, isolated community with a record number of HEAs minted there.

Dr. Joe Whelan’s turn finally arrives in this book and it’s fate, or rather, Alvarez, who chooses to pair him up with Mackenna Jones, a gun-shy wedding-dress maker who flees when it comes to making a hard and fast commitment. But Joe isn’t all that jaded despite his past and even after attraction turns into something more, his ability to look forward might be the only thing that will see him across the finish line especially when Mac herself falters and stumbles.

I think the only part of the book that was difficult was the ‘final conflict’ so to speak where I found it unforgivable of Mac for what she did in the end to Joe (hitting him where it hurts the most) though, and was incredulous for Joe’s seeming acceptance and easy forgiveness of it. I did love Joe from the beginning and that did play a part in my own judgement of Mac not really deserving him at the very moment he needed her to step out for the both of them. Maybe it’s me being cynical and petty, but I did expect better of her despite her own reservations and her cowardly inability to decide what she really wanted. She did treat him unfairly, first running, then leaving a note that barely explained a thing—and her actions didn’t seem congruous of the love she proclaimed to have for him—especially when seen in contrast to Joe’s steadfast loyalty. But I’d be the first to admit that I prefer my heroines who dare to put themselves out there with a bit more pluck, particularly when their other halves show themselves as determined and unmovable.

The best part about ‘Saying I Do’ however, is that nothing is all that it seems. There’s no straight case of one-upping each other or a straight road where the jilted protagonist comes around to the idea of marriage, but multiple layers of (self?)deception, denial and desire that overlap like a finely-made pastry that’s a mouthwatering feast. It’s also characteristic of Tracey Alvarez’s quirky but stylish writing, but I loved the additional and rather authentic use of Irishisms here (or rather, the typical vocab used in the British Isles) that gave the story its strong flavour. Already, I want more of the gossipy Due South crew, in all their smugness, laughter and love.

four-stars

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