Rookie Move by Sarina Bowen

Posted in Advanced Reader Copy/ Contemporary Romance/ Netgalley/ New Adult/ Reviews/ Sports/ Young Adult 29th July 2016
Rookie Move by Sarina BowenRookie Move by Sarina Bowen
Series: Brooklyn Bruisers, #1
Published by Berkley on September 6th 2016
Pages: 336
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three-stars

Hockey player Leo Trevi has spent the last six years trying to do two things: get over the girl who broke his heart, and succeed in the NHL. But on the first day he’s called up to the newly franchised Brooklyn Bruisers, Leo gets checked on both sides, first by the team’s coach—who has a long simmering grudge, and then by the Bruisers’ sexy, icy publicist—his former girlfriend Georgia Worthington.   Saying goodbye to Leo was one of the hardest things Georgia ever had to do—and saying hello again isn’t much easier. Georgia is determined to keep their relationship strictly professional, but when a press conference microphone catches Leo declaring his feelings for her, things get really personal, really fast....

Reading ‘Rookie Move’ is akin to being given a privilege pass into the back rooms of a high-profile sports team and despite not having the foggiest idea about hockey at all (European football’s more my thing), I found myself getting excited by everything I read behind the scenes: the media hype and speculation about transfers, billionaire bosses, new signings, bosses and managerial conflicts; essentially, the complex, framework behind the game itself and the number of people it took to keep the entire engine and brand running smoothly.

It’s thoroughly engaging stuff, but that’s probably because of Sarina Bowen’s assured writing, the motley crew of hockey players she’s created here and her special, nuanced understanding of the game itself. Loosely tied to The Ivy Years series, the first of which being the only one I read, I still never found myself lost at all, which means ‘Rookie Move’ is rock-solid as a standalone.

Leo Trevi has lots going for him: he’s a male lead whose camp I found myself in immediately because he’s the all-round good guy and does everything to prove it. And there just aren’t enough of them of late, especially in fiction when the bad boys seem to be all the (overrated) rage these days.

But what’s not to like, really? He tries hard at everything, doing all it did stay in the upper echelons of hockey and wouldn’t give up on Georgia when all she’d done was to cause him pain. My frustration with Georgia might seem a little unfair given her traumatic past, yet it’s difficult to excuse her actions for treating Leo like her personal punching bag. The frosty, standoffish (and hypocritical) front she takes up with Leo when she was the one who’d given up on them to begin with baffled me, a sentiment that soon morphed into disbelief and not just a slight bit of loathing when she pushed him away constantly to protect herself after meeting him again 6 years later.

Above all, I thought there simply weren’t enough cathartic moments between Leo and Georgia. There’s so much Bowen covers about the hockey season, the plays, the trades and even the sex scenes that I thought it compromised just how much both Leo/Georgia needed to sort out outside the bedroom. At least that was something I felt I badly needed to read about, given Bowen’s brave penchant for writing trauma into her characters – that they needed *not* to gloss over the events that had been so pivotal in their high school days. That this aspect was so insufficiently dealt with somehow made this pairing’s getting together never a sure thing (dependent rather, on Georgia’s current courage-metre) until the abrupt end that left me dissatisfied and disappointed.

Character-gripes aside, Brooklyn Bruisers is shaping up to be a series that I could get into: there’re secondary characters who are crying out for their own stories to be told and perhaps, even a mysterious billionaire owner who might need his own HEA.

three-stars

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